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October PD

You can add to the professional development post by commenting below or emailing the library.

Online resources

Webpage

Drug and alcohol use

An Australian Government website providing information and resources for drug and alcohol issues

Read – professional reading

Available from the library database

Dertadian, G. C., Dixon, T. C., Iversen, J., & Maher, L. (2017). Self‐limiting non‐medical pharmaceutical opioid use among young people in Sydney, Australia: An exploratory study. Drug And Alcohol Review, 36(5), 643-650.

Patrick, M. E., Evans-Polce, R., Kloska, D. D., Maggs, J. L., & Lanza, S. T. (2017). Age-Related Changes in Associations Between Reasons for Alcohol Use and High-Intensity Drinking Across Young Adulthood. Journal Of Studies On Alcohol And Drugs, 78(4), 558-570

Rowe, R., Berger, I., Yaseen, B., & Copeland, J. (2017). Risk and blood‐borne virus testing among men who inject image and performance enhancing drugs, Sydney, Australia. Drug And Alcohol Review, 36(5), 658-666.

Silins, E., Swift, W., Slade, T., Toson, B., Rodgers, B., & Hutchinson, D. M. (2017). A prospective study of the substance use and mental health outcomes of young adult former and current cannabis users. Drug And Alcohol Review, 36(5), 618-625.

Simonavicius, E., Robson, D., McEwen, A., & Brose, L. S. (2017). Cessation support for smokers with mental health problems: a survey of resources and training needs. Journal Of Substance Abuse Treatment, 80(1), 37-44.

Open Access Articles

Roger Collier (2017). Harm reduction is about providing safety for patients. CMAJ 2017;189 doi:10.1503/cmaj.1095489

Mishna, F., Fantus, S., & McInroy, L. B. (2017). Informal use of information and communication technology: Adjunct to traditional face-to-face social work practice. Clinical Social Work Journal, 45(1), 49-55.
Pegg, K. J., O’Donnell, A. W., Lala, G., & Barber, B. L. (2017). The role of online social identity in the relationship between alcohol-related content on social networking sites and adolescent alcohol use. Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking.
Shepherd, S. M., Delgado, R. H., Sherwood, J., & Paradies, Y. (2017). The impact of indigenous cultural identity and cultural engagement on violent offending. BMC Public Health, 18(1), 50.
Smolkina, M., K. I. Morley, F. Rijsdijk, A. Agrawal, J. E. Bergin, E. C. Nelson, D. Statham, N. G. Martin, and M. T. Lynskey. “Cannabis and Depression: A Twin Model Approach to Co-morbidity.” Behavior Genetics 47, no. 4 (2017): 394-404.

Open access online journal

BMC Psychology:An open access peer-reviewed journal covering all aspects of psychology

Useful resource

Drug and Alcohol Findings: Drug  Matrix Cell: Reducing Harm

Drug Treatment Matrix initiates a fortnightly course on the evidence base for harm reduction and treatment in relation to illegal drugs. Comprehensively updated, the cell explores key research on interventions to reduce the harms to the user as a result of their drug use.

e-Book of the month

Schiraldi, G. R. (2016). The Self-Esteem Workbook. Oakland: New Harbinger Publications

The Self-Esteem Workbook includes up-to-date information on brain plasticity, and new chapters on forgiveness, mindfulness, and cultivating loving kindness and compassion. If your self-esteem is based solely on performance—if you view yourself as someone who’s worthy only when you’re performing well or acknowledged as doing a good job—the way you feel about yourself will always depend on external factors. Your self-esteem affects everything you do, so if you feel unworthy or your confidence is shaped by others, it can be a huge problem.With this second edition of The Self-Esteem Workbook, you’ll learn to see yourself through loving eyes by realizing that you are inherently worthy, and that comparison-based self-criticism is not a true measure of your value. In addition to new chapters on cultivating compassion, forgiveness, and unconditional love for yourself and others—all of which improve self-esteem—you’ll find cutting-edge information on brain plasticity and how sleep, exercise, and nutrition affect your self-esteem.Developing and maintaining healthy self-esteem is key for living a happy life, and with the new research and exercises you’ll find in this updated best-selling workbook, you’ll be ready to start feeling good about yourself and finally be the best that you can be (copied from the EBSCO database).

Free to download for all HOA staff from the library catalogue on work computers

Attend – informal learning sessions, journal club, seminar series

Insight Queensland

Free training sessions at Biala Community Health Centre in Brisbane, unless otherwise specified including:

  • Introduction to motivational interviewing for AOD use: October 5 (Brisbane), October 6 (Townsville), December 1 (Cairns) 9:00-16:30. Prerequisite online induction module 5
  • AOD relapse, prevention and management: October 17 (Brisbane), November 10 (Townsville), November 27 (Cairns) 9:00-16:30. Prerequisite online induction module 5
  • Family inclusive practice in AOD treatment: October 26 (Brisbane) 9:00-16:30.
  • Introduction to AOD clinical supervision: October 31 (Brisbane) 9:00-16:30
  • Introduction to mindfulness in AOD: October 12 (Brisbane) 9:00-16:30

Register here

Online induction modules are a prerequisite to some of the courses. To access and download them visit www.insightqld.org

Listen – podcasts, webinars

Insight Qld

Free webinars on Wednesdays 10:00-11:00 (AEST). Access here

  • October 4: AOD and the Law – What you should know
  • October 11: Substance use disorders among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People in Custody; a public health opportunity
  • October 18: GEM: Growth and Empowerment Measure
  • October 25: “Getting Ready for Change”: Improving entry and retention into allied health services

More details here

Targeting anti-smoking efforts for disadvantaged groups.

In this podcast Professor Billie Bonevski is interviewed by the Medical Journal of Australia, where she discusses some of the issues effecting different population groups including Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders, Culturally and Linguistically Diverse communities and those from low socio-economic groups. Listen to it here

Non-suicidal self-injury within LGBTI Communities

The LGBT Alliance Mindout project is hosting a presentation by Madeline Wishart from Youth Support Advisory Service in Melbourne to help workers understand self-injury and how it differs behaviourally for suicide. She will also present on her research on sexual orientation and how it impacts on non-suicidal self-injury.

The free webinar is on Tuesday 26/09/2017 from 1-2pm. Register here.

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2016 Review of illicit drug use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

The Australian Indigenous Alcohol and Other Drug Knowledge Centre (the Knowledge Centre) has launched a new eBook based on the 2016 Review of illicit drug use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, produced by the Knowledge Centre. The team from the Knowledge Centre hopes that the electronic version will be a good learning tool for those in the AOD sector. Illicit drug use is an issue of concern to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous Australians, and this eBook provides a comprehensive synthesis of information for those involved in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health.

The eBook has been created for Apple devices such as iPads, iPhones, laptops and desktop computers. It is free to download from iTunes, or the Knowledge Centre website. There is also an accompanying animated infographic which has been developed based on the review. Please find links below:

 

Illicit drug use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (animated infographic)

 

2016 Review of illicit drug use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (eBook)

 https://itunes.apple.com/au/book/illicit-drug-use/id1226941831?mt=11&ign-mpt=uo%3D4

Links to download are also available from the Knowledge Centre website:

http://www.aodknowledgecentre.net.au/aodkc/about-us/news/5243

 (Australian Indigenous Alcohol and other Drugs Knowledge Centre , 2017)

 


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National Drug Strategy Household Survey 2016

Access the survey here 

Summary

Younger people (under 30 years old) are drinking and smoking less and using less illicit drugs than in 2001. However, people in their 40s, 50s and 60s have not significantly changed their drug usage over this period, although their use of some drugs has increased since 2013.

Tobacco smoking

  • Smoking rates have been on downward trend over the long-term, but have not significantly declined since 2013.
  • There are fewer teenagers smoking and the average age for first use has increased to age 16.3 from age 15.9 years in 2013.
  • The amount smoked has decreased significantly since 2001, but there was no significant decrease from 2013 rates.
  • Males are more likely to smoke than females
  • The proportion of never smokers was 60% in 2016, compared to 62% in 2013
  • Smoking has declined by over 40% in people in their 20s and 30s and 20% for people in their 40s and 50s over the last 15 years. However, it hasn’t declined significantly in those over the age of 60.
  • More smokers are rolling theit own cigarettes as opposed to ready made cigarettes
  • Support for harm reduction policies remains high

Alcohol use

  • Fewer people than in 2013 exceeded the lifetime risk guidelines for drinking alcohol.
  • Young adults were drinking less. 42% of 18-24 year olds drinking at least 5 standard drinks per month as opposed to 47% in 2013.
  •  82% of 12-17 year olds abstained from alcohol in 2016 compared to 72% in 2013.
  • More people in their 50s were drinking 11 or more standard drinks on one occasion compared to 2013.
  • The proportion of people reporting being a victim of alcohol related harm decreased from 26% in 2013 to 22% in 2016.
  • Males are more than twice as likely as females to exceed the lifetime risk guidelines. However the difference is narrowing as less fewer males drink at risky levels while female risky drinking is unchanged.
  • Most alcohol policy measures received reduced support in 2016 than in 2013

Illicit drug use

  • Less use of some illegal drugs was seen in 2016 including meth/amphetamines, hallucinogens and synthetic cannabinoids
  • 1 in 20 Australians in 2016 misused pharmaceutical medication
  • Reports of being a victim of a drug-related incident increased to 1.8million in 2016, up from 1.6million in 2013
  • Cocaine use has been increasing since 2004 from 1% to 2.5%
  • More people over the age of 40 reported misuse of drugs mainly pharmaceuticals and cannabis
  • Cannabis, heroin and cocaine were perceived to be less likely to be thought of as a drug problem as compared to meth/amphetamine

Meth/amphetamines

  • Crystal or ice continued to be the main form used up to 57% in 2016 from 50% in 2013
  • Powder use declined from 29% in 2013 to 20% in 2016
  • People’s perception of meth/amphetamines changed between 2013 and 2016 with it being nominated as the drug most likely to be drug problem and also the cause of most drug related deaths for the first time


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Facts about Drugs Videos

The Drug Policy Alliance has produced a series of four short videos about MDMA, Methamphetamine, Heroin and Cocaine which aim to present straightforward, factual information. Each video is only two minutes long and covers the history of each of these drugs, how they work, the major health risks of each substance and practice harm reduction advice.