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June e-book of the month

Ethics in psychotherapy and counseling: a practical guide by Pope, K.S., Vasquez, M.J.T. (2011)

This book provides advice and discussion on ethical dilemmas which may be faced by those counselling clients. Whilst it is obviously written for those practicing in the USA, with continuous referencing to the American Psychological Association Professional Guidelines, it contains valid information for those practicing elsewhere. I’m not a psychologist or counsellor, but I found it an interesting and informative read, which wasn’t too dry. It lends itself to both reading in its entirety and dipping into as required. I would particularly recommend it to new entrants to the professions to assist them to establish boundaries and limits in the therapeutic relationship.

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May e-book of the month

The Wiley Handbook of Anxiety Disorders by Emmelcamp, P.M.G. & Ehring, T. (2014)

This is a comprehensive book which provides an overview of management and classification of anxiety disorders. It is well organised and spilt into sections covering:

  • Classification
  • Etiology
  • Specific disorders
  • Special populations
  • Prevention
  • Clinical assesment
  • Treatment
  • Clinical management of specific disorders
  • Clinical management of comorbidity
  • Approaches to improve effectiveness
  • Agenda for future research

It’s a book that can be dipped in and out of as needed or be read as a whole to provide the reader with a solid background on anxiety and its treatment and management.

This e-book is available free to access for Healthy Options staff and volunteers from the library using the organisation’s computers.


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Book of the month: April 2017

Gray, D., Shaw, G., d’Abbs, P., Brooks, D., Stearne, A., Mosey, A., & Spooner, C. (2006). Policing, volatile substance misuse, and Indigenous Australians. Mardon, SA: National Drug Law Enforcement Research Fund.
This is more of a research report than a book, although it is 136 pages long. The authors conducted interviews in remote communities throughout Australia to try to find a solution to volatile substance misuse amongst Indigenous Australians. They interviewed police, members of the community and users to ascertain their opinions. Whilst the majority felt that something needed to be done, no solution was found, although their were several suggestions. The overwhelming feeling was that the police, various levels of government and community members should work in partnership to develop trusting relationships and to maintain the safety of the users and the community. It is an interesting and informative report and is worth a read by those who have an interest in Indigenous Communities or substance abuse.
It is available to download for all Healthy Options staff via our library webpage.


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Book of the month: March

We’ve decided to run a book of the month club in order to highlight our e-book collection. All the books featured are available to download and read on HOA computers from our library catalogue. If you’re having trouble accessing them please contact your librarian for assistance. To make it more like a real book club we would love comments on this post when you’ve read it or suggestions for future featured titles. This month’s book is a nice short one of 50 pages to ease you in gently:

Parental drug and alcohol use: resilience and transition amongst young people by Angus Bancroft et al (2004)

This is a short snappy book that examines the effects on children of growing up with parents or carers who misuse alcohol or other drugs from their perspective as young adults. It includes several narratives from the young people, which made it an interesting and insightful read. It also includes background material throughout the book written by the authors, which is easy to read and digest. The book concludes with a discussion which succinctly summarises the contents. It was interesting to note how diverse the narratives were whilst still maintaining a similar underlying thread. It was a very moving read, made more so by how optimistic many of the subjects remained despite their childhoods.