HOA LIBRARY


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February PD

You can add to the professional development post by commenting below or emailing the library.

Online resources

Read – professional reading

Available from the library database

  • Chen, J. A., Owens, M. D., Browne, K. C., & Williams, E. C. (2018). Alcohol-related and mental health care for patients with unhealthy alcohol use and posttraumatic stress disorder in a National Veterans Affairs cohort. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 85, 1-9.
  • Cunningham, M., Stapinski, L., Griffiths, S., & Baillie, A. (2017). Dysmorphic Appearance Concern and Hazardous Alcohol Use in University Students: The Mediating Role of Alcohol Expectancies. Australian Psychologist, 52 (6), 424-432.
  • Gair, S., & Baglow, L. (2017). Australian Social Work Students Balancing Study, Work, and Field Placement: Seeing it Like it Is. Australian Social Work, 1-12.
  • Powers, J. R., Loxton, D., Anderson, A. E., Dobson, A. J., Mishra, G. D., Hockey, R., & Brown, W. J. (2018). Changes in smoking, drinking, overweight and physical inactivity in young Australian women 1996–2013. Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 28(3), 255-259.
  • Thompson, K., & van Vliet, P. (2018). Critical Reflection on the Ethics of Mindfulness. Australian Social Work, 71(1), 120-128.
Open Access Articles

 

Open access online journal

Addictive behaviours

Open access textbook

Lester, D. (2014). The” I” of the Storm: Understanding the Suicidal Mind. Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG.

Useful resources

Harm Reduction Australia, Opioid Treatment Programs 2017 Forum Reports: Queensland; NSW; Victoria

Hepatitis SA Library for resources and information on hepatitis

Open access resources for health sciences from Curtin University

e-Book of the month

Bhatia, S. C., Petty, F., & Gabel, T. (2017). Substance and Nonsubstance Related Addiction Disorder: Diagnosis and Treatment. [S.l.]: Bentham Science Publishers Ltd.

An accessible handbook about the two main types of addiction disorders. It is divided into three sections which cover 1) the scientific underpinnings of addiction disorders (neurobiology, addiction neural reward pathways, genetic and psychosocial basis of addiction, screening and treatment), 2) information about substances commonly used by addicts (pharmacology, diagnostics and treatment considerations) and 3) current understandings of the diagnosis and treatment of behavioral problems (such as gambling), respectively. Key features: covers both substance abuse and behavioral problems uses a reader friendly format with a patient education handout style includes key learning points listed in each chapter -includes clinical vignettes which outline brief history, evaluation, diagnostic considerations with successful pharmacological, psychological and social interventions -includes references in each chapter disorders. (copied from the EBSCO database)

Free to download for all HOA staff from the library catalogue on work computers

Attend – informal learning sessions, journal club, seminar series

 

National comorbidity guidelines free online training and website

The training program consists of 10 training modules that can be completed in any order. Registrants can choose which modules to engage in based on interest and experience. Those wishing to receive a certificate of completion must complete all modules (in any order) and successfully complete all quizzes.

At the end of each module, registrants will be presented with a quiz. All questions must be answered correctly before the module is completed, but there is no limit to how many times the quiz can be taken. Incorrect answers will refer participants to relevant sections of the Guidelines website.

At the completion of all modules, training participants will receive a certificate of completion.

Journal club TBA

Attend – conferences 

Australia and New Zealand Addiction Conference, 28-30 May 2018 at QT Gold Coast

This conference will cover a range of topics including  prevention, treatment, systematic responses, behaviours, mental health and harm reduction in relation to all types of addiction.  The program will include emerging trends and the various addictive habits of alcohol and other drugs, gambling, internet, sex, gaming,  food, shopping, pyromania, kleptomania.

Cost from $500-1000. Register here

Write – presentations and papers

Are you thinking of getting your work published in an academic journal? Read these tips of what not to do from a large publisher.

Call for abstract submissions for the Australia and New Zealand Addiction Conference. It can be in the form of a 3o minute presentation, a poster presentation or a panel presentation on one of the conference topics. Closing date 05/02/2018. More details are available here.

Listen – podcasts, webinars

NueRA talks:  a series of free online seminars which bring information on neuroscience research. Examples include:

  • Living loving schizophrenia
  • The neuroscience of resilience to stress

Insight presentation recordings available now on YouTube

Assessed learning – short courses, certificates, diplomas, bachelors, post-grad

Strengths based practice: This workshop will provide participants with the chance to practice strength based skills:

Date: 22/02/2018, 09:00-16:30

Location:      Lighthouse Resources Upstairs Training Room Kyabra Street RUNCORN, QLD. 4113

Cost: $240. Register here

Lighthouse Resources run a number of other workshops

 

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January Professional Development

You can add to the professional development post by commenting below or emailing the library.

Online resources

Webpage

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet contains useful resources about Indigenous health

Useful resources

Drug and Alcohol Research Connections. December 2017

NIDA Notes. The latest in NIDA drug abuse research

 Read – professional reading

Available from the library database

  • Gomes de Matos, E., Kraus, L., Hannemann, T., Soellner, R., & Piontek, D. (2017). Cross‐cultural variation in the association between family’s socioeconomic status and adolescent alcohol use. Drug and Alcohol Review, 36(6), 797-804.
  • Hallgren, K. A., Dembe, A., Pace, B. T., Imel, Z. E., Lee, C. M., & Atkins, D. C. (2018). Variability in motivational interviewing adherence across sessions, providers, sites, and research contexts. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 84(1), 30-41.
  • Harris, N., Miles, D., Howard, E., Zuchowski, I., King, J., Dhephasadin Na Ayudhaya, P., & … Puthantharayil, G. (2017). International Student Exchange in Australian Social Work Education. Australian Social Work, 70(4), 429-440.
  • Laux, J. M., DuFresne, R., Dari, T., & Juhnke, G. A. (2017). Substance Use Assessment Instruments: 13 Years Later. Journal of Addictions & Offender Counseling, 38(2), 115-124.
  • Li, W. W., & Miller, D. J. (2017). The impact of coping and resilience on anxiety among older Australians. Australian Journal of Psychology, 69(4), 263-272.

Open Access Articles

Open Access Journal

NADA Advocate is published four times a year, raises significant issues relating to the NSW non-government alcohol and other drug sector, and develops knowledge about, and connections within the sector.

 e-Book of the month

Free to download for all HOA staff from the library catalogue on work computers

Reiter, M. D. (2015). Substance Abuse and the Family. New York, NY: Routledge.

Substance Abuse and the Family demonstrates what it means to view addiction through a systems lens by considering biology and genetics, family relationships, and larger systems. Throughout the text, Michael D. Reiter shows how to examine a person’s predilection to become addicted, his or her social environment around substance use, the functionality of his or her family, and various treatment options. Chapters are organized around two sections: Assessment and Treatment. The first section pays attention to how the family system organizes around substance use and abuse. Here family roles, culture, and other issues such as family violence and resilience are covered. Two chapters are also included on the neuroscience and genetics of addiction, with contributions from Jaime L. Tartar and Christina Gobin. There are also chapters on working with partial systems, using genograms, and working in a culturally-sensitive way (with contributions from Dalis Arismendi), with culture-specific consideration paid to African American, Hispanic and Latin American, Asian American, and Native American families. The second half of the book explores what a systems orientation means in practice and goes over self-help groups for individuals and families. An overview of the major family therapy theories is included, which examines intergenerational, experiential, communication approaches, strategic, systemic, and post-modern models. A separate chapter examines issues faced by both youth and adult children of alcoholics. Intended for undergraduate and graduate students, as well as beginning practitioners, this text is one of the most penetrating and in-depth examinations on the topic available.

(copied from EBSCO site)

Attend – informal learning sessions, journal club, seminar series

National comorbidity guidelines free online training and website

The training program consists of 10 training modules that can be completed in any order. Registrants can choose which modules to engage in based on interest and experience. Those wishing to receive a certificate of completion must complete all modules (in any order) and successfully complete all quizzes.

At the end of each module, registrants will be presented with a quiz. All questions must be answered correctly before the module is completed, but there is no limit to how many times the quiz can be taken. Incorrect answers will refer participants to relevant sections of the Guidelines website.

At the completion of all modules, training participants will receive a certificate of completion.

(copied from National Comorbidity website)

Journal club TBA

Attend – conferences 

The 2018 Australian and New Zealand Addiction Conference will be held on Monday 28 and Tuesday 29 May with optional workshops on Wednesday 30 May at QT Gold Coast.

The 4th annual conference will cover a broad range of topics including prevention, treatment, systematic responses, behaviours, mental health and harm reduction in relation to all types of addiction.  Emerging trends and the various addictive habits of alcohol and other drugs, gambling and the internet are also covered.

Early bird registration from $599-899.

Write – presentations and papers

NADA invites abstract submissions for oral papers, workshops, panel presentations and poster presentations for the 2018 NADA Conference: Exploring therapeutic interventions.

This is an opportunity for you to showcase your innovative practice and research addressing the diverse and complex needs of people accessing AOD services.

Download the Call for Abstracts – information flyer for further details.

Abstracts must be submitted by Wednesday 28 February 2018 at 5pm EST to conference@nada.org.au

The NADA Conference will be held on 7-8 June 2018 at Sheraton on the Park, Sydney.

(copied from NADA website)

Listen – podcasts, webinars

Insight presentation recordings available now on YouTube

The Struggle of Mental Health TED Playlist

People who have struggled with mental illness tell their stories in this series of 10 talks.

Assessed learning – short courses, certificates, diplomas, bachelors, post-grad

Tools for Hard Conversations

Date: 11 January 2018 Facilitator: Kath Reid Workshop Duration: 1 day Workshop Time: 09:30 — 16:30 Early Bird Rate: $220.00 for registration received by 25/12/2017 Fees: $240.00 including morning tea and lunch, statement of attendance and all associated material and handouts. Workshop Venue: Lighthouse Resources Upstairs Training Room, Kyabra Street RUNCORN, QLD. 4113

(copied from Lighthouse website)

Registration/more information


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December PD

You can add to the professional development post by commenting below or emailing the library.

Online resources

Webpage

The Healing Foundation is an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organization that partners with communities to address the ongoing trauma caused by actions such as the forced removal of children.

Read – professional reading

Available from the library database

  • Davis, A. K., Rosenberg, H., & Rosansky, J. A. (2017). American counselors’ acceptance of non-abstinence outcome goals for clients diagnosed with co-occurring substance use and other psychiatric disorders. Journal Of Substance Abuse Treatment, 82(1), 29-33.
  • Fitzpatrick, J. P., Oscar, J., Carter, M., Elliott, E. J., Latimer, J., Wright, E., & Boulton, J. (2017). The MaruluStrategy 2008–2012: overcoming Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) in the Fitzroy Valley. Australian And New Zealand Journal Of Public Health, 41(5), 467-473.
  • Gass, J. C., Morris, D. H., Winters, J., VanderVeen, J. W., & Chermack, S. (2018). Characteristics and clinical treatment of tobacco smokers enrolled in a VA substance use disorders clinic. Journal Of Substance Abuse Treatment, 84(1), 1-8.
  • Godden, N. J. (2017). The Love Ethic: A Radical Theory for Social Work Practice. Australian Social Work, 70(4), 405-416.
  • Meredith, S. E., Rash, C. J., & Petry, N. M. (2017). Alcohol use disorders are associated with increased HIV risk behaviors in cocaine-dependent methadone patients. Journal Of Substance Abuse Treatment, 83(1), 10-14.

Open Access Articles

Open access online journal

Harm Reduction Journal is a peer-reviewed international journal of original research and scholarship on drug use and its consequences for individuals, communities, and larger populations.

Open access textbooks

Open textbook library

Useful resources

Cracks in the ice resources for health professionals

Dovetail Drug Slang and Acronym List

Drug and alcohol findings is  a UK-based resource which bridges the gap between research and practice

SMART Recovery Australia Worksheets

Reports

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. (2017). Australia’s Welfare 2017

Whetton, S., Shanahan, M., Cartwright, K., Duraisingam, V., Ferrante, A., Gray, D., Kaye, S., Kostadinov, V., McKetin, R., Pidd, K., Roche, A., Tait, R.J. and Allsop, S. (2017). The Social Costs of Methamphetamine in Australia 2013/14. National Drug Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia. Summary

e-Book of the month

Petry, N. M. (2012). Contingency Management for Substance Abuse Treatment : A Guide to Implementing This Evidence-Based Practice. New York: Routledge.

Isn’t it unethical to pay people to do what they should be doing anyway? Won’t patients just sell the reinforcers and buy drugs?Others didn’t get prizes for not using. Why should they? The concerns surrounding Contingency Management (CM) are many and reflect how poorly understood and rarely utilized this evidence-based treatment model is in practice settings. Despite being identified as the most efficacious intervention for substance use disorders, a significant gap persists between research and practice, at the client’s expense. Nancy Petry, an experienced researcher and consultant for organizations such as the National Institute of Health, has begun to fill this gap by authoring the first clinician-oriented text that focuses on CM protocol development and implementation. In this well-organized and clear book she provides a foundation for understanding CM and details how to design and implement a program that can work for any clinician, whether he or she works for a well-funded program or not. She also addresses realistic concerns such as: How to describe CM to eligible and ineligible patients How to calculate the costs of CM interventions How to solicit donations and raise funds to support CM interventions How to stock a prize cabinet and keep track of prizes Over 50 charts, worksheets, and tables are provided to help the clinician pinpoint exactly which behaviors to target, brainstorm how to reinforce change, and develop a treatment plan that incorporates cost, length of treatment, and method for determining patient compliance. More than just filling a void, Dr. Petry provides all of the tools clinicians require to successfully apply a novel treatment in practice. (Description from EBSCO database)

Free to download for all HOA staff from the library catalogue on work computers

Attend – informal learning sessions, journal club, seminar series

Insight Queensland

Free training session:

Introduction to motivational interviewing for AOD use

1 December, 09:00-16:30 at Cairns

Prerequisite: Online Induction Material – Module 5

This workshop develops core skills in working with clients who are ambivalent about making change to their substance use. This interactive skills-based course covers:

• motivational interviewing principles and processes

• using the OARS micro-counselling skills

• brief motivational assessment

• motivational interviewing strategies

• practical skills development

For more details contact jennifer.Brazier@health.qld.gov.au

Online induction modules are a prerequisite to some of the courses. To access and download them visit www.insightqld.org

Listen – podcasts, webinars

All in the mind is a series of podcasts about mental health from the ABC

Cracks in the ice on demand webinars about methamphetamine

Disasters, trauma and mental health is a podcast about how disasters and trauma impact on an individual’s mental health presented by the Centre for Rural and Remote Mental Health


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November PD

You can add to the professional development post by commenting below or emailing the library.

Online resources

Webpage

FASD Hub Australia: information on Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) for Australian health professionals, teachers, justice professionals, service providers, researchers or parents and carers.

Read – professional reading

Available from the library database

  • Deacon, R. M., & Mooney‐Somers, J. (2017). Smoking prevalence among lesbian, bisexual and queer women in Sydney remains high: Analysis of trends and correlates. Drug And Alcohol Review, 36(4), 546-554.
  • Holzhauer, C. G., Epstein, E. E., Hayaki, J., Marinchak, J. S., McCrady, B. S., & Cook, S. M. (2017). Moderators of sudden gains after sessions addressing emotion regulation among women in treatment for alcohol use. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment.
  • Hyshka, E., Anderson, J. T., & Wild, T. C. (2017). Perceived unmet need and barriers to care amongst street‐involved people who use illicit drugs. Drug And Alcohol Review, 36(3), 295-304
  • McPherson, L. (2017). Kinship Care: Increasing Child Well-being through Practice, Policy and Research. Australian Social Work, 70(4), 515-516.

  • Tarzia, L., Maxwell, S., Valpied, J., Novy, K., Quake, R., & Hegarty, K. (2017). Sexual violence associated with poor mental health in women attending Australian general practices. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 41(5), 518-523.

 

Open Access Articles

Reports

Useful resource

Australian Government Head to Health: National mental health portal

e-Book of the month

Crittenden, P. M. (2014). Attachment and Family Therapy. Maidenhead, Berkshire: McGraw-Hill Education

This book explores an integration of ideas from attachment theory and systemic family therapy including current developments and integrated cases.

Free to download for all HOA staff from the library catalogue on work computers

Attend – informal learning sessions, journal club, seminar series

Insight Queensland

Free training sessions at Biala Community Health Centre in Brisbane, unless otherwise specified including:

  • Introduction to motivational interviewing for AOD use – Cairns 01/12/2017, 09:00-16:30.  Prerequisite online induction material module 5
  • AOD relapse prevention and management –  Townsville 10/11/2017; Cairns 27/11/2017, 09:00-16:30. Prerequisite online induction material module 6
  • Advanced harm reduction including safer injecting practices – Brisbane 28/11/2107, 09:00-16:30
  • Culturally secure AOD practice featuring IRIS (2 day workshop) – Brisbane 20/11/2107 – 21/11/2017, 09:00-16:30
  • Crystal clear: responding to methamphetamine use – Brisbane 02/11/2017, 09:00-13:00

Workshops can be either attended in person or via webinar. For more details and to register click here

For Townsville workshops please contact the Mental Health Staff Development Team on (07) 4433 9480 or email MHCAMB@health.qld.gov.au for workshop information

For Cairns please contact Jennifer.Brazier@health.qld.gov.au for workshop information

Online induction modules are a prerequisite to some of the courses. To access and download them visit www.insightqld.org

Attend – conferences 

APSAD Scientific Alcohol and Drug Conference, Pullman Melbourne Albert Park. 12-15 November 2017

Full program now available

Registration from $460 – $1070. Online registrations are now closed, contact the conference secretariat: asadconference@ashm.org.au or 02 8204 0770 

Write – presentations and papers

Get your research published. The Drug an Alcohol Review have published guidelines for authors

Listen – podcasts, webinars

Insight Qld

Free webinars on Wednesdays 10:00-11:00 (AEST). Access here

  • 01/11/2017: New services for comorbidity – Addiction and Mental Health Short Stay Unit (Dr Shaladran Padayachee and Staff, Addiction and Mental Health Short Stay Unit – Logan Hospital)
  • 08/11/2017: Smoking Cessation Clinical Pathway Project: A new approach (Natalie Davis, Health Promotion Officer – Addiction Services, PAH; Deepali Gupta, Senior Pharmacist – Preventative Team PAH)
  • 15/11/2017: Treating eating disorders made easy (Associate Professor Warren Ward, Director – QuEDS)
  • 22/11/2017: Alt-truth and the post truth world. Where does AOD evidence fit in Trump’s universe? (Dr Jeremy Hayllar, Clinical Director, Metro North Mental Health – Alcohol & Drug Service)

More details here

Assessed learning – short courses, certificates, diplomas, bachelors, post-grad

Psychological First Aid

Learn to provide psychological first aid to people in an emergency by employing the RAPID model: Reflective listening, Assessment of needs, Prioritization, Intervention, and Disposition.

This is a free self-directed online course offered by John Hopkins University, delivered over 5 weeks. It costs 61 USD if you require a certificate. For more details and to enroll click here


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Mental health in rural and remote communties: annotated bibliography

Allen, J., Inder, K. J., Lewin, T. J., Attia, J., & Kelly, B. J. (2012). Social support and age influence distress outcomes differentially across urban, regional and remote Australia: an exploratory study. BMC Public Health, 12(1), 928.
The aim of this study was to examine whether increasing remoteness had any effect on psychological distress. 4219 people over 55 years were surveyed across New South Wales about their levels of social support, demographic details, remoteness and levels of psychological distress experienced. The report concluded that remoteness could reduce the levels of psychological distress associated with a lack of social support. This may be due to people living in remote areas having a higher level of self-sufficiency. The study was limited in that it only studied older people.
Blignault, I., Haswell, M., & Pulver, L. J. (2016). The value of partnerships: lessons from a multi‐site evaluation of a national social and emotional wellbeing program for Indigenous youth. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 40(S1).
This study provides the results of a three-year evaluation of SAM our way- a program that aimed to improve the social and emotional wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander living in remote and regional areas of Australia. Five out of the 14 sites were studied, selecting from diverse locations over several states and in depth case studies were performed. The best performing sites were those where strong local partnerships had been formed with the local Indigenous community. Several lessons were learned including the importance of program design and resourcing and ways of working. It was essential to build partnerships with the local community including training and engaging members and working consistently with them, taking things slowly. Evaluation is essential and needs to be built into the programs. Activities need to be engaging and, effective integrating with other programs and services.
Carey, T. A., Wakerman, J., Humphreys, J. S., Buykx, P., & Lindeman, M. (2013). What primary health care services should residents of rural and remote Australia be able to access? A systematic review of “core” primary health care services. BMC Health Services Research, 13(1), 178.
A systematic review was performed to address which primary healthcare services should be accessible to all Australians regardless of geography. It was done in response to the inequality in access to healthcare faced by those in remote and rural communities. It concluded that defining a list of core services was difficult but that they should be an appropriate fit for service and evidence-based. Policy makers, consumers, practitioners and researchers need to work together in developing them to ensure that they are affordable and accessible to all.
Inder, K. J., Handley, T. E., Fitzgerald, M., Lewin, T. J., Coleman, C., Perkins, D., & Kelly, B. J. (2012). Individual and district-level predictors of alcohol use: cross sectional findings from a rural mental health survey in Australia. BMC Public Health, 12(1), 586.
Excessive alcohol use has been cited as a problem in rural and remote Australia and this study aimed to examine the geographical variation in rates and the potential effects of socio-economic disadvantage, population change and remoteness from services in contributing to this disparity. A survey was performed on 1981 people randomly taken from the electoral role using the Australian Rural Mental Health Study. It found that gender, age, marital status and personality status were the biggest contributors to at risk alcohol use. Financial advantage and experiencing multiple recent adverse life events also contributed to increased alcohol use. Relatively few district-level factors were linked to increased alcohol consumption after controlling for other factors.
Inder, K. J., Handley, T. E., Johnston, A., Weaver, N., Coleman, C., Lewin, T. J., & Kelly, B. J. (2014). Determinants of suicidal ideation and suicide attempts: parallel cross-sectional analyses examining geographical location. BMC Psychiatry, 14(1), 208.
Suicide rates are consistently higher in rural than urban settings so this study aimed to examine if there were any differences in determinants of suicidal ideation and attempts between the areas. The main determinants were psychological distress and mental illness. Parallel cross-sectional analyses were performed using data from the 2007 National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing (n=8463) and the Australian Rural and Mental Health Study (n=634). The former was under representative of rural and remote participants and the latter was over representative. Geographical location was not found to be associated with suicidal ideation or attempt, but socio-economic factors were significantly associated with higher rates of suicidality. Access to lethal means and isolation, resulting in not being found quickly may also affect the rate of suicidality. It stressed the importance of developing and evaluating targeted evidence-based intervention strategies for at risk groups.
Morandini, J. S., Blaszczynski, A., Dar‐Nimrod, I., & Ross, M. W. (2015). Minority stress and community connectedness among gay, lesbian and bisexual Australians: a comparison of rural and metropolitan localities. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 39(3), 260-266.
The aim of this study was to examine the impact of locality on minority stress experienced by lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) Australians. Increased stress and lack of community connectedness experienced by LGB individuals has been associated with increased depression, drug and alcohol use and suicidality. Data was collected by survey (n=1306) to assess minority stressors, connection with community and social isolation. The results were than analysed to assess the effect of locality on these stressors independent of gender, age, ethnicity, education and income. Those living in rural and remote areas and unexpectedly outer metropolitan areas experienced higher levels of stressors and high LGB disconnection than those living in inner metropolitan areas. Reluctance to disclose sexuality, including increased concealment of sexuality from friends and internalised homophobia in men were more common in rural and remote communities. This will put them at increased risk of psychiatric morbidity. It recommends health promotion in these communities that is aimed at reducing homophobia and discrimination and support services to assist those struggling with stigma and isolation.


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October PD

You can add to the professional development post by commenting below or emailing the library.

Online resources

Webpage

Drug and alcohol use

An Australian Government website providing information and resources for drug and alcohol issues

Read – professional reading

Available from the library database

Dertadian, G. C., Dixon, T. C., Iversen, J., & Maher, L. (2017). Self‐limiting non‐medical pharmaceutical opioid use among young people in Sydney, Australia: An exploratory study. Drug And Alcohol Review, 36(5), 643-650.

Patrick, M. E., Evans-Polce, R., Kloska, D. D., Maggs, J. L., & Lanza, S. T. (2017). Age-Related Changes in Associations Between Reasons for Alcohol Use and High-Intensity Drinking Across Young Adulthood. Journal Of Studies On Alcohol And Drugs, 78(4), 558-570

Rowe, R., Berger, I., Yaseen, B., & Copeland, J. (2017). Risk and blood‐borne virus testing among men who inject image and performance enhancing drugs, Sydney, Australia. Drug And Alcohol Review, 36(5), 658-666.

Silins, E., Swift, W., Slade, T., Toson, B., Rodgers, B., & Hutchinson, D. M. (2017). A prospective study of the substance use and mental health outcomes of young adult former and current cannabis users. Drug And Alcohol Review, 36(5), 618-625.

Simonavicius, E., Robson, D., McEwen, A., & Brose, L. S. (2017). Cessation support for smokers with mental health problems: a survey of resources and training needs. Journal Of Substance Abuse Treatment, 80(1), 37-44.

Open Access Articles

Roger Collier (2017). Harm reduction is about providing safety for patients. CMAJ 2017;189 doi:10.1503/cmaj.1095489

Mishna, F., Fantus, S., & McInroy, L. B. (2017). Informal use of information and communication technology: Adjunct to traditional face-to-face social work practice. Clinical Social Work Journal, 45(1), 49-55.
Pegg, K. J., O’Donnell, A. W., Lala, G., & Barber, B. L. (2017). The role of online social identity in the relationship between alcohol-related content on social networking sites and adolescent alcohol use. Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking.
Shepherd, S. M., Delgado, R. H., Sherwood, J., & Paradies, Y. (2017). The impact of indigenous cultural identity and cultural engagement on violent offending. BMC Public Health, 18(1), 50.
Smolkina, M., K. I. Morley, F. Rijsdijk, A. Agrawal, J. E. Bergin, E. C. Nelson, D. Statham, N. G. Martin, and M. T. Lynskey. “Cannabis and Depression: A Twin Model Approach to Co-morbidity.” Behavior Genetics 47, no. 4 (2017): 394-404.

Open access online journal

BMC Psychology:An open access peer-reviewed journal covering all aspects of psychology

Useful resource

Drug and Alcohol Findings: Drug  Matrix Cell: Reducing Harm

Drug Treatment Matrix initiates a fortnightly course on the evidence base for harm reduction and treatment in relation to illegal drugs. Comprehensively updated, the cell explores key research on interventions to reduce the harms to the user as a result of their drug use.

e-Book of the month

Schiraldi, G. R. (2016). The Self-Esteem Workbook. Oakland: New Harbinger Publications

The Self-Esteem Workbook includes up-to-date information on brain plasticity, and new chapters on forgiveness, mindfulness, and cultivating loving kindness and compassion. If your self-esteem is based solely on performance—if you view yourself as someone who’s worthy only when you’re performing well or acknowledged as doing a good job—the way you feel about yourself will always depend on external factors. Your self-esteem affects everything you do, so if you feel unworthy or your confidence is shaped by others, it can be a huge problem.With this second edition of The Self-Esteem Workbook, you’ll learn to see yourself through loving eyes by realizing that you are inherently worthy, and that comparison-based self-criticism is not a true measure of your value. In addition to new chapters on cultivating compassion, forgiveness, and unconditional love for yourself and others—all of which improve self-esteem—you’ll find cutting-edge information on brain plasticity and how sleep, exercise, and nutrition affect your self-esteem.Developing and maintaining healthy self-esteem is key for living a happy life, and with the new research and exercises you’ll find in this updated best-selling workbook, you’ll be ready to start feeling good about yourself and finally be the best that you can be (copied from the EBSCO database).

Free to download for all HOA staff from the library catalogue on work computers

Attend – informal learning sessions, journal club, seminar series

Insight Queensland

Free training sessions at Biala Community Health Centre in Brisbane, unless otherwise specified including:

  • Introduction to motivational interviewing for AOD use: October 5 (Brisbane), October 6 (Townsville), December 1 (Cairns) 9:00-16:30. Prerequisite online induction module 5
  • AOD relapse, prevention and management: October 17 (Brisbane), November 10 (Townsville), November 27 (Cairns) 9:00-16:30. Prerequisite online induction module 5
  • Family inclusive practice in AOD treatment: October 26 (Brisbane) 9:00-16:30.
  • Introduction to AOD clinical supervision: October 31 (Brisbane) 9:00-16:30
  • Introduction to mindfulness in AOD: October 12 (Brisbane) 9:00-16:30

Register here

Online induction modules are a prerequisite to some of the courses. To access and download them visit www.insightqld.org

Listen – podcasts, webinars

Insight Qld

Free webinars on Wednesdays 10:00-11:00 (AEST). Access here

  • October 4: AOD and the Law – What you should know
  • October 11: Substance use disorders among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People in Custody; a public health opportunity
  • October 18: GEM: Growth and Empowerment Measure
  • October 25: “Getting Ready for Change”: Improving entry and retention into allied health services

More details here

Targeting anti-smoking efforts for disadvantaged groups.

In this podcast Professor Billie Bonevski is interviewed by the Medical Journal of Australia, where she discusses some of the issues effecting different population groups including Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders, Culturally and Linguistically Diverse communities and those from low socio-economic groups. Listen to it here

Non-suicidal self-injury within LGBTI Communities

The LGBT Alliance Mindout project is hosting a presentation by Madeline Wishart from Youth Support Advisory Service in Melbourne to help workers understand self-injury and how it differs behaviourally for suicide. She will also present on her research on sexual orientation and how it impacts on non-suicidal self-injury.

The free webinar is on Tuesday 26/09/2017 from 1-2pm. Register here.


Leave a comment

September PD

You can add to the professional development post by commenting below or emailing the library.

Online resources

Webpage

Youth AOD toolbox: The latest evidence and theory on adolescent development and substance use, behaviour change, building resilience, supporting recovery and simultaneously addressing the determinants of AOD problems

Read – professional reading

Available from the library database

Chapman, A. R., & Babor, T. F. (2017). Duterte’s War on Drugs and the Silence of the Addiction Science Community. Journal Of Studies On Alcohol And Drugs, 78(4), 491-493.

Graham, V. E., Campbell, S., West, C., & Clough, A. R. (2017). Substance misuse intervention research in remote Indigenous Australian communities since the NHMRC ‘Roadmap’. Australian And New Zealand Journal Of Public Health, 41(4), 424-431.

Ralph, S., & Ryan, K. (2017). Addressing the Mental Health Gap in Working with Indigenous Youth: Some Considerations for Non‐Indigenous Psychologists Working with Indigenous Youth. Australian Psychologist, 52(4), 288-298.

Simoneau, H., Kamgang, E., Tremblay, J., Bertrand, K., Brochu, S., and Fleury, M.-J. (2017) Efficacy of extensive intervention models for substance use disorders: A systematic review. Drug and Alcohol Review

Yurasek, A. M., Merrill, J. E., Metrik, J., Miller, M. B., Fernandez, A. C., & Borsari, B. (2017). Marijuana use in the context of alcohol interventions for mandated college students. Journal Of Substance Abuse Treatment, 79(1), 53-60.

Open Access Articles

 

Open access textbook

Open access online journal

Addiction Science & Clinical Practice

e-Book of the month

Van Dijk, S. (2012). DBT Made Simple : A Step-by-Step Guide to Dialectical Behavior Therapy. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications

Originally developed for the treatment of borderline personality disorder, dialectical behavior therapy, or DBT, has rapidly become one of the most popular and most effective treatments for all mental health conditions rooted in out-of-control emotions. However, there are limited resources for psychologists seeking to use DBT skills with individual clients. In the tradition of ACT Made Simple, DBT Made Simple provides clinicians with everything they need to know to start using DBT in the therapy room. The first part of this book briefly covers the theory and research behind DBT and explains how DBT differs from traditional cognitive behavioral therapy approaches. The second part focuses on strategies professionals can use in individual client sessions, while the third section teaches the four skills modules that form the backbone of DBT: core mindfulness, distress tolerance, emotion regulation, and interpersonal effectiveness. The book includes handouts, case examples, and example therapist-client dialogue—everything clinicians need to equip their clients with these effective and life-changing skills.

Free to download for all HOA staff from the library catalogue on work computers

Attend – informal learning sessions, journal club, seminar series

Insight Queensland

Free training sessions at Biala Community Health Centre in Brisbane, unless otherwise specified including:

Micro-counselling and brief interventions 7th September 09:00-16:30

In the counselling environment, a well-established therapeutic relationship provides the necessary foundation for delivering a wide range of treatment interventions that enhance treatment outcomes.

In the AOD counselling environment, brief interventions are often delivered opportunistically to raise a client’s awareness of some of the issues associated with their AOD use. A sound skill in the use of micro-counselling skills can build a strong therapeutic relationship that thereby facilitates clients’ optimal receipt of treatment for problematic AOD use.

AOD Clinical Assessment 8th September (Townsville); 14th September (Brisbane); 18th September (Cairns) 09:00-16:30

Prerequisite: Online Induction Material – Module 4

This interactive workshop introduces participants to clinical assessment for alcohol and other drug problems.

Topics covered include:

• raising the issue of alcohol and other drug use with clients

• screening instruments

• assessment instruments

• bio-psychosocial elements of assessment

• situational alcohol and other drug risks

• practical skill development exercises.

Understanding psychoactive drugs 15th September (Cairns) 09:00-16:30

Prerequisite: Online Induction Material – Module 2

This workshop is designed for those wanting to gain a basic understanding of what psychoactive drugs are and the various licit and illicit substances used in Australia today.

The workshop also covers:

• classification and effects of psychoactive drugs (including street names for commonly used drugs)

• patterns of use and harms from substance use

• basic neurobiology

• intoxication and overdose

• tolerance and withdrawal

• pharmacotherapies currently available

Presenters: Jeff Buckley and Damien Martin

Culturally secure AOD practice 19th-20th September (Cairns); 25th-26th September (Brisbane) 09:00-16:30

This updated 2-day workshop aims to build cultural capacity when working with Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people who use substances. Designed for both Indigenous and non-Indigenous workers alike, the course promotes a culturally-secure AOD framework and approach to direct practice.
Participants will learn how to use the Indigenous Risk Impact Screen (IRIS) and associated brief intervention tools alongside other practical tips, tricks, tools and resources for use in everyday practice.

Presenters: Damien Martin

Online induction modules are a prerequisite to some of the courses. To access and download them visit www.insightqld.org

Attend – conferences 

Changing the Game: 30 years of Drug and Alcohol Research

National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre: Sydney October 3rd and 4th

Examining the changes that have occurred in the last 30 years and presenting cutting edge research, treatment prevention and epidemiology. To register and for more details click here.

Cost $250-500

https://ndarc.med.unsw.edu.au/content/2017-ndarc-annual-research-symposium

Listen – podcasts, webinars

How to support families and friends with a loved one using methamphetamine

4th September 1:00-2:00 AEST

This webinar will provide attendees with information on recent trends in use of the drug ice in Australia, and introduces a new online toolkit providing evidence-based information for the Australian community. Funded by the Australian Government Department of Health, the Cracks in the Ice online toolkit was developed with input from community members and researchers across Australia. It includes information for health professionals, families and friends of people using ice, teachers, and general community members. Expected benefits of participating in this webinar include:

• Increased awareness of changing patterns of ice use in Australia

• Increased understanding of the role community members and health professionals can play in becoming more informed about the drug ice

• Increased knowledge about where to access evidence-based information, resources and support related to ice.

Register here

Insight QLD

Free online webinars 10:00-11:00. Register here

September 6th

A trip through the garden: plant based presentations

There are a wide variety of substances occurring in the natural environment. Some plants and mushrooms have long histories of use in different cultures. This presentation will provide an overview of a small selection of naturally occurring substances that clinicians may encounter in their work. It will cover DMT, magic mushrooms, mescaline containing cactus, opium poppies and datura with information on prevalence, effects and potential risks and harms.”

September 13th

A healthy lifestyle approach to co-existing mental health and substance problems

The 20 year gap in longevity between people with, versus without, co-existing mental health and substance misuse problems has drawn recent focus to quality of life and physical health more broadly. This presentation focuses on the progression from single focus (mental health) to dual focus (mental health and substance misuse) and then to a broader recovery focus and recommendations for conceptualising, screening and addressing substance use disorders within mental health systems.