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October PD

You can add to the professional development post by commenting below or emailing the library.

Online resources

Webpage

Drug and alcohol use

An Australian Government website providing information and resources for drug and alcohol issues

Read – professional reading

Available from the library database

Dertadian, G. C., Dixon, T. C., Iversen, J., & Maher, L. (2017). Self‐limiting non‐medical pharmaceutical opioid use among young people in Sydney, Australia: An exploratory study. Drug And Alcohol Review, 36(5), 643-650.

Patrick, M. E., Evans-Polce, R., Kloska, D. D., Maggs, J. L., & Lanza, S. T. (2017). Age-Related Changes in Associations Between Reasons for Alcohol Use and High-Intensity Drinking Across Young Adulthood. Journal Of Studies On Alcohol And Drugs, 78(4), 558-570

Rowe, R., Berger, I., Yaseen, B., & Copeland, J. (2017). Risk and blood‐borne virus testing among men who inject image and performance enhancing drugs, Sydney, Australia. Drug And Alcohol Review, 36(5), 658-666.

Silins, E., Swift, W., Slade, T., Toson, B., Rodgers, B., & Hutchinson, D. M. (2017). A prospective study of the substance use and mental health outcomes of young adult former and current cannabis users. Drug And Alcohol Review, 36(5), 618-625.

Simonavicius, E., Robson, D., McEwen, A., & Brose, L. S. (2017). Cessation support for smokers with mental health problems: a survey of resources and training needs. Journal Of Substance Abuse Treatment, 80(1), 37-44.

Open Access Articles

Roger Collier (2017). Harm reduction is about providing safety for patients. CMAJ 2017;189 doi:10.1503/cmaj.1095489

Mishna, F., Fantus, S., & McInroy, L. B. (2017). Informal use of information and communication technology: Adjunct to traditional face-to-face social work practice. Clinical Social Work Journal, 45(1), 49-55.
Pegg, K. J., O’Donnell, A. W., Lala, G., & Barber, B. L. (2017). The role of online social identity in the relationship between alcohol-related content on social networking sites and adolescent alcohol use. Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking.
Shepherd, S. M., Delgado, R. H., Sherwood, J., & Paradies, Y. (2017). The impact of indigenous cultural identity and cultural engagement on violent offending. BMC Public Health, 18(1), 50.
Smolkina, M., K. I. Morley, F. Rijsdijk, A. Agrawal, J. E. Bergin, E. C. Nelson, D. Statham, N. G. Martin, and M. T. Lynskey. “Cannabis and Depression: A Twin Model Approach to Co-morbidity.” Behavior Genetics 47, no. 4 (2017): 394-404.

Open access online journal

BMC Psychology:An open access peer-reviewed journal covering all aspects of psychology

Useful resource

Drug and Alcohol Findings: Drug  Matrix Cell: Reducing Harm

Drug Treatment Matrix initiates a fortnightly course on the evidence base for harm reduction and treatment in relation to illegal drugs. Comprehensively updated, the cell explores key research on interventions to reduce the harms to the user as a result of their drug use.

e-Book of the month

Schiraldi, G. R. (2016). The Self-Esteem Workbook. Oakland: New Harbinger Publications

The Self-Esteem Workbook includes up-to-date information on brain plasticity, and new chapters on forgiveness, mindfulness, and cultivating loving kindness and compassion. If your self-esteem is based solely on performance—if you view yourself as someone who’s worthy only when you’re performing well or acknowledged as doing a good job—the way you feel about yourself will always depend on external factors. Your self-esteem affects everything you do, so if you feel unworthy or your confidence is shaped by others, it can be a huge problem.With this second edition of The Self-Esteem Workbook, you’ll learn to see yourself through loving eyes by realizing that you are inherently worthy, and that comparison-based self-criticism is not a true measure of your value. In addition to new chapters on cultivating compassion, forgiveness, and unconditional love for yourself and others—all of which improve self-esteem—you’ll find cutting-edge information on brain plasticity and how sleep, exercise, and nutrition affect your self-esteem.Developing and maintaining healthy self-esteem is key for living a happy life, and with the new research and exercises you’ll find in this updated best-selling workbook, you’ll be ready to start feeling good about yourself and finally be the best that you can be (copied from the EBSCO database).

Free to download for all HOA staff from the library catalogue on work computers

Attend – informal learning sessions, journal club, seminar series

Insight Queensland

Free training sessions at Biala Community Health Centre in Brisbane, unless otherwise specified including:

  • Introduction to motivational interviewing for AOD use: October 5 (Brisbane), October 6 (Townsville), December 1 (Cairns) 9:00-16:30. Prerequisite online induction module 5
  • AOD relapse, prevention and management: October 17 (Brisbane), November 10 (Townsville), November 27 (Cairns) 9:00-16:30. Prerequisite online induction module 5
  • Family inclusive practice in AOD treatment: October 26 (Brisbane) 9:00-16:30.
  • Introduction to AOD clinical supervision: October 31 (Brisbane) 9:00-16:30
  • Introduction to mindfulness in AOD: October 12 (Brisbane) 9:00-16:30

Register here

Online induction modules are a prerequisite to some of the courses. To access and download them visit www.insightqld.org

Listen – podcasts, webinars

Insight Qld

Free webinars on Wednesdays 10:00-11:00 (AEST). Access here

  • October 4: AOD and the Law – What you should know
  • October 11: Substance use disorders among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People in Custody; a public health opportunity
  • October 18: GEM: Growth and Empowerment Measure
  • October 25: “Getting Ready for Change”: Improving entry and retention into allied health services

More details here

Targeting anti-smoking efforts for disadvantaged groups.

In this podcast Professor Billie Bonevski is interviewed by the Medical Journal of Australia, where she discusses some of the issues effecting different population groups including Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders, Culturally and Linguistically Diverse communities and those from low socio-economic groups. Listen to it here

Non-suicidal self-injury within LGBTI Communities

The LGBT Alliance Mindout project is hosting a presentation by Madeline Wishart from Youth Support Advisory Service in Melbourne to help workers understand self-injury and how it differs behaviourally for suicide. She will also present on her research on sexual orientation and how it impacts on non-suicidal self-injury.

The free webinar is on Tuesday 26/09/2017 from 1-2pm. Register here.

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September PD

You can add to the professional development post by commenting below or emailing the library.

Online resources

Webpage

Youth AOD toolbox: The latest evidence and theory on adolescent development and substance use, behaviour change, building resilience, supporting recovery and simultaneously addressing the determinants of AOD problems

Read – professional reading

Available from the library database

Chapman, A. R., & Babor, T. F. (2017). Duterte’s War on Drugs and the Silence of the Addiction Science Community. Journal Of Studies On Alcohol And Drugs, 78(4), 491-493.

Graham, V. E., Campbell, S., West, C., & Clough, A. R. (2017). Substance misuse intervention research in remote Indigenous Australian communities since the NHMRC ‘Roadmap’. Australian And New Zealand Journal Of Public Health, 41(4), 424-431.

Ralph, S., & Ryan, K. (2017). Addressing the Mental Health Gap in Working with Indigenous Youth: Some Considerations for Non‐Indigenous Psychologists Working with Indigenous Youth. Australian Psychologist, 52(4), 288-298.

Simoneau, H., Kamgang, E., Tremblay, J., Bertrand, K., Brochu, S., and Fleury, M.-J. (2017) Efficacy of extensive intervention models for substance use disorders: A systematic review. Drug and Alcohol Review

Yurasek, A. M., Merrill, J. E., Metrik, J., Miller, M. B., Fernandez, A. C., & Borsari, B. (2017). Marijuana use in the context of alcohol interventions for mandated college students. Journal Of Substance Abuse Treatment, 79(1), 53-60.

Open Access Articles

 

Open access textbook

Open access online journal

Addiction Science & Clinical Practice

e-Book of the month

Van Dijk, S. (2012). DBT Made Simple : A Step-by-Step Guide to Dialectical Behavior Therapy. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications

Originally developed for the treatment of borderline personality disorder, dialectical behavior therapy, or DBT, has rapidly become one of the most popular and most effective treatments for all mental health conditions rooted in out-of-control emotions. However, there are limited resources for psychologists seeking to use DBT skills with individual clients. In the tradition of ACT Made Simple, DBT Made Simple provides clinicians with everything they need to know to start using DBT in the therapy room. The first part of this book briefly covers the theory and research behind DBT and explains how DBT differs from traditional cognitive behavioral therapy approaches. The second part focuses on strategies professionals can use in individual client sessions, while the third section teaches the four skills modules that form the backbone of DBT: core mindfulness, distress tolerance, emotion regulation, and interpersonal effectiveness. The book includes handouts, case examples, and example therapist-client dialogue—everything clinicians need to equip their clients with these effective and life-changing skills.

Free to download for all HOA staff from the library catalogue on work computers

Attend – informal learning sessions, journal club, seminar series

Insight Queensland

Free training sessions at Biala Community Health Centre in Brisbane, unless otherwise specified including:

Micro-counselling and brief interventions 7th September 09:00-16:30

In the counselling environment, a well-established therapeutic relationship provides the necessary foundation for delivering a wide range of treatment interventions that enhance treatment outcomes.

In the AOD counselling environment, brief interventions are often delivered opportunistically to raise a client’s awareness of some of the issues associated with their AOD use. A sound skill in the use of micro-counselling skills can build a strong therapeutic relationship that thereby facilitates clients’ optimal receipt of treatment for problematic AOD use.

AOD Clinical Assessment 8th September (Townsville); 14th September (Brisbane); 18th September (Cairns) 09:00-16:30

Prerequisite: Online Induction Material – Module 4

This interactive workshop introduces participants to clinical assessment for alcohol and other drug problems.

Topics covered include:

• raising the issue of alcohol and other drug use with clients

• screening instruments

• assessment instruments

• bio-psychosocial elements of assessment

• situational alcohol and other drug risks

• practical skill development exercises.

Understanding psychoactive drugs 15th September (Cairns) 09:00-16:30

Prerequisite: Online Induction Material – Module 2

This workshop is designed for those wanting to gain a basic understanding of what psychoactive drugs are and the various licit and illicit substances used in Australia today.

The workshop also covers:

• classification and effects of psychoactive drugs (including street names for commonly used drugs)

• patterns of use and harms from substance use

• basic neurobiology

• intoxication and overdose

• tolerance and withdrawal

• pharmacotherapies currently available

Presenters: Jeff Buckley and Damien Martin

Culturally secure AOD practice 19th-20th September (Cairns); 25th-26th September (Brisbane) 09:00-16:30

This updated 2-day workshop aims to build cultural capacity when working with Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people who use substances. Designed for both Indigenous and non-Indigenous workers alike, the course promotes a culturally-secure AOD framework and approach to direct practice.
Participants will learn how to use the Indigenous Risk Impact Screen (IRIS) and associated brief intervention tools alongside other practical tips, tricks, tools and resources for use in everyday practice.

Presenters: Damien Martin

Online induction modules are a prerequisite to some of the courses. To access and download them visit www.insightqld.org

Attend – conferences 

Changing the Game: 30 years of Drug and Alcohol Research

National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre: Sydney October 3rd and 4th

Examining the changes that have occurred in the last 30 years and presenting cutting edge research, treatment prevention and epidemiology. To register and for more details click here.

Cost $250-500

https://ndarc.med.unsw.edu.au/content/2017-ndarc-annual-research-symposium

Listen – podcasts, webinars

How to support families and friends with a loved one using methamphetamine

4th September 1:00-2:00 AEST

This webinar will provide attendees with information on recent trends in use of the drug ice in Australia, and introduces a new online toolkit providing evidence-based information for the Australian community. Funded by the Australian Government Department of Health, the Cracks in the Ice online toolkit was developed with input from community members and researchers across Australia. It includes information for health professionals, families and friends of people using ice, teachers, and general community members. Expected benefits of participating in this webinar include:

• Increased awareness of changing patterns of ice use in Australia

• Increased understanding of the role community members and health professionals can play in becoming more informed about the drug ice

• Increased knowledge about where to access evidence-based information, resources and support related to ice.

Register here

Insight QLD

Free online webinars 10:00-11:00. Register here

September 6th

A trip through the garden: plant based presentations

There are a wide variety of substances occurring in the natural environment. Some plants and mushrooms have long histories of use in different cultures. This presentation will provide an overview of a small selection of naturally occurring substances that clinicians may encounter in their work. It will cover DMT, magic mushrooms, mescaline containing cactus, opium poppies and datura with information on prevalence, effects and potential risks and harms.”

September 13th

A healthy lifestyle approach to co-existing mental health and substance problems

The 20 year gap in longevity between people with, versus without, co-existing mental health and substance misuse problems has drawn recent focus to quality of life and physical health more broadly. This presentation focuses on the progression from single focus (mental health) to dual focus (mental health and substance misuse) and then to a broader recovery focus and recommendations for conceptualising, screening and addressing substance use disorders within mental health systems.

 


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July PD

You can add to the professional development post by commenting below or emailing the library.

Online resources

Read – professional reading

Available from the library database

Clough, A., Margolis, S., Miller, A., Shakeshaft, A., Doran, C., McDermott, R., & … West, C. (2017). Alcohol management plans in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous) Australian communities in Queensland: community residents have experienced favourable impacts but also suffered unfavourable ones. BMC Public Health, 17(1), 1-14.

Degenhardt, L., Sara, G., McKetin, R., Roxburgh, A., Dobbins, T., Farrell, M., & … Hall, W. D. (2017). Crystalline methamphetamine use and methamphetamine‐related harms in Australia. Drug And Alcohol Review, 36(2), 160-170.

Jakobsen, H., Andersson, G., Havik, O. E., & Nordgreen, T. (2017). Guided Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy for mild and moderate depression: A benchmarking study. Internet Interventions, 7(1), 1-8.

Tolou-Shams, M., Dauria, E., Conrad, S. M., Kemp, K., Johnson, S., & Brown, L. K. (2017). Outcomes of a family-based HIV prevention intervention for substance using juvenile offenders. Journal Of Substance Abuse Treatment, 77(1), 115-125.

 

Open Access Articles

 

 

Open access online journal

Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health

Useful resources

NCETA’s Ice Training for Frontline Workers

A free comprehensive evidence based resource. NCETA continues to update and expand the resource, and Centre staff are working on a series of customised topics to address the professional development needs of specific workforces. These include the following customised topics which will be added to the resource in the next few months:

  • Working with families in which methamphetamine use is a problem
  • Working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People and Communities
  • Recovery-focused support.

Drug and alcohol research connections

A joint publication of the collaborative network of alcohol and other drug research centres; National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre (NDARC) at UNSW; National Drug Research Institute (NDRI) at Curtin University; and National Centre for Education and Training on Addiction (NCETA) at Flinders University.

e-Book of the month

Bhatia, S. C., Petty, F., & Gabel, T. (2017). Substance and Nonsubstance Related Addiction Disorder: Diagnosis and Treatment. [S.l.]: Bentham Science Publishers Ltd.

Substance and Non substance Related Addiction Disorders: Diagnosis and Treatment is an accessible handbook about the two main types of addiction disorders. It is divided into three sections which cover 1) the scientific underpinnings of addiction disorders (neurobiology, addiction neural reward pathways, genetic and psychosocial basis of addiction, screening and treatment), 2) information about substances commonly used by addicts (pharmacology, diagnostics and treatment considerations) and 3) current understandings of the diagnosis and treatment of behavioral problems (such as gambling), respectively. Key features: -covers both substance abuse and behavioral problems -uses a reader friendly format with a patient education handout style -includes key learning points listed in each chapter -includes clinical vignettes which outline brief history, evaluation, diagnostic considerations with successful pharmacological, psychological and social interventions -includes references in each chapter The handbook meets the information needs of medical students and professionals (family physicians, nurses, addiction therapists, psychiatry residents, and other health care professionals) interested in the primary care of patients afflicted with addiction disorders.Subjects:Substance abuse–Treatment

Free to download for all HOA staff from the EBSCO Host platform on work computers

Attend – informal learning sessions, journal club, seminar series

Alcohol and other drug treatment in prison

Presenter: Michael Doyle, University of Sydney

Thursday, 6 July 2017 @ 2pm-3pm

This Aboriginal-led PhD project investigated the experiences of 31 men (14 Aboriginal and 17 non-Aboriginal) of prison-based AoD treatment programs. The results and findings for this research will be reported in this presentation, which will also include findings from a systematic review of international peer-reviewed literature in prison-based AoD treatment research. Cost: free of charge

 Venue and full details

RSVP: ndriau@curtin.edu.au

 

Insight Queensland

Free training session at Biala Community Health Centre in Brisbane:

Culturally secure AOD practice featuring IRIS

This updated 2-day workshop aims to build cultural capacity when working with Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people who use substances. Designed for both Indigenous and non-Indigenous workers alike, the course promotes a culturally-secure AOD framework and approach to direct practice.

Participants will learn how to use the Indigenous Risk Impact Screen (IRIS) and associated brief intervention tools alongside other practical tips, tricks, tools and resources for use in everyday practice.

Dates 4-5/07/2017 9-4pm

Register here

Online induction modules are a prerequisite to some of the courses. To access and download them visit www.insightqld.org

Attend – conferences 

APSAD Scientific Alcohol and Drugs Conference, Melbourne, 12-15 November 2017.

No details on program as yet.

Registration between $540-1170 for the full conference, depnding when you register and your professional status

Write – presentations and papers

ATCA Conference –  Brisbane from 31 October to 3 November 2017.

Information will be posted on the ATCA website in the coming days, and registrations will be open this week.  There will be site visits to TCs on the Gold Coast (Goldbridge and Fairhaven), the Sunshine Coast (WHOS Najara) and Brisbane (Logan House and Moonyah) on Tuesday 31 November, followed by the conference program on Wednesday-Friday and concluding with interactive workshops on Friday afternoon (3 November).

A Call for Abstracts has now gone out and submissions close on Friday 25 August 2017 in the following themes:

ATCA recognises that not all innovation comes from research but from the need to tackle a persistent problem, using creativity, imagination and ingenuity. If you have a story, message or anecdote to share, then share your work and ideas with them. Conference Themes include:

  • TC practice: Partnerships for new ideas and new initiatives
  • Cultural partnerships: working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander, Mãori and Pasifika peoples
  • Working with Families: Family involvement in treatment, interventions for children affected by parental substance use and associated issues
  • Continuing care: Re-thinking community partnerships
  • Co-morbidity: Best practice for people with co-occurring AOD and mental health issues
  • Corrective services and coerced clients: Working collaboratively with our partners in the justice system
  • Attachment and Trauma: Interventions and recovery

Applications will be assessed on the following criteria:

  • The relevance of the abstract to the themes
  • The validity of the evidence on which the presentation is based
  • The implications for practitioners implementing the findings
  • The relevance of innovative programmes to other practitioners in the field.

Presenters are required to register for the Australasian Therapeutic Communities Conference. 

Presentation Types:

Oral Presentation: These will take place in chaired sessions and are 15 minutes in length plus 5 minutes question time. 

Poster display: poster presentations are visual displays used to communicate a message i.e. research findings, program highlights, etc. Poster presenters will be provided with maximum coverage through dedicated poster sessions during which time presenters are required to stand by their posters. This provides an intimate forum for the exchange of information by allowing more personal discussion between presenter and audience.  Posters may be in a traditional format, or as a  Powerpoint presentation on a continuous loop on the presenter’s own laptop.

Participatory workshop: There is the opportunity for half-day workshops on Friday afternoon (3 November) to encourage the interactive transfer of skills and practical solutions to common problems or specific themes.

Project Snapshot: Each project snapshot will be allocated 10-minute oral presentation time with the use of audio-visual equipment if desired and four minutes of questions.

Seminar: Several presenters are encouraged to submit a group of abstracts on a specific topic and share a 90-minute presentation time as they explore the topic in depth. These sessions will be led by a facilitator.

Yarning Circle: The Circle will be permanently accessible as a Cultural Space as well as having times for organised sessions during the conference gathering. These sessions will be led by a main presenter, or group of presenters, and be approximately one hour in duration with the opportunity for multiple speakers on given themes.

Yarning is an informal conversation that is culturally friendly and recognised by Aboriginal people as meaning to talk about something, someone or provide and receive information (Dawn Bessarab, 2012).  In the conference context, it is a place where all people can have a casual or deep conversation about something or anything. The truth is always spoken in a yarning circle. Yarning circles are designed so that everyone has an opportunity to contribute in a safe and respectful setting. The yarning circle will have a few main speakers to lead discussion however, all attendees are encouraged to participate in the conversation if they feel comfortable.

Submit your abstracts to atca@atca.com.au

Listen – podcasts, webinars

Alcohol and mental health podcast

Alcohol use disorder is often co-morbid with a variety of mental health conditions. It can be challenging for clinicians to tease out which of these conditions are primary, with alcohol being used as an attempt to alleviate symptoms, and which of these are secondary to the physiological and psychosocial impacts of alcohol itself.  (50 minutes duration)

Access here

Watch – videos

First time with a new pill or powder: This short video published back in 2013 from Global Drug Survey called “First time with a new pill or powder”, provides common sense harm reduction information for people who use or are planning to experiment with pills or powders as these substances can sometimes cause significant harm.

 

 


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National Drug Strategy Household Survey 2016

Access the survey here 

Summary

Younger people (under 30 years old) are drinking and smoking less and using less illicit drugs than in 2001. However, people in their 40s, 50s and 60s have not significantly changed their drug usage over this period, although their use of some drugs has increased since 2013.

Tobacco smoking

  • Smoking rates have been on downward trend over the long-term, but have not significantly declined since 2013.
  • There are fewer teenagers smoking and the average age for first use has increased to age 16.3 from age 15.9 years in 2013.
  • The amount smoked has decreased significantly since 2001, but there was no significant decrease from 2013 rates.
  • Males are more likely to smoke than females
  • The proportion of never smokers was 60% in 2016, compared to 62% in 2013
  • Smoking has declined by over 40% in people in their 20s and 30s and 20% for people in their 40s and 50s over the last 15 years. However, it hasn’t declined significantly in those over the age of 60.
  • More smokers are rolling theit own cigarettes as opposed to ready made cigarettes
  • Support for harm reduction policies remains high

Alcohol use

  • Fewer people than in 2013 exceeded the lifetime risk guidelines for drinking alcohol.
  • Young adults were drinking less. 42% of 18-24 year olds drinking at least 5 standard drinks per month as opposed to 47% in 2013.
  •  82% of 12-17 year olds abstained from alcohol in 2016 compared to 72% in 2013.
  • More people in their 50s were drinking 11 or more standard drinks on one occasion compared to 2013.
  • The proportion of people reporting being a victim of alcohol related harm decreased from 26% in 2013 to 22% in 2016.
  • Males are more than twice as likely as females to exceed the lifetime risk guidelines. However the difference is narrowing as less fewer males drink at risky levels while female risky drinking is unchanged.
  • Most alcohol policy measures received reduced support in 2016 than in 2013

Illicit drug use

  • Less use of some illegal drugs was seen in 2016 including meth/amphetamines, hallucinogens and synthetic cannabinoids
  • 1 in 20 Australians in 2016 misused pharmaceutical medication
  • Reports of being a victim of a drug-related incident increased to 1.8million in 2016, up from 1.6million in 2013
  • Cocaine use has been increasing since 2004 from 1% to 2.5%
  • More people over the age of 40 reported misuse of drugs mainly pharmaceuticals and cannabis
  • Cannabis, heroin and cocaine were perceived to be less likely to be thought of as a drug problem as compared to meth/amphetamine

Meth/amphetamines

  • Crystal or ice continued to be the main form used up to 57% in 2016 from 50% in 2013
  • Powder use declined from 29% in 2013 to 20% in 2016
  • People’s perception of meth/amphetamines changed between 2013 and 2016 with it being nominated as the drug most likely to be drug problem and also the cause of most drug related deaths for the first time