HOA LIBRARY


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May PD

You can add to the professional development post by commenting below or emailing the library.

Online resources

Read – professional reading

Available from the library database

Geerlings, L. R., Thompson, C. L., Bouma, R., & Hawkins, R. (2018). Cultural Competence in Clinical Psychology Training: A Qualitative Investigation of Student and Academic Experiences. Australian Psychologist, 53(2), 161-170.

Massey, S. H., Newmark, R. L., & Wakschlag, L. S. (2018). Explicating the role of empathic processes in substance use disorders: A conceptual framework and research agenda. Drug And Alcohol Review, 37(3), 316-332.

Rychert, M., Wilkins, C., Parker, K., & Witten, K. (2018). Are government‐approved products containing new psychoactive substances perceived to be safer and more socially acceptable than alcohol, tobacco and illegal drugs? Findings from a survey of police arrestees in New Zealand. Drug And Alcohol Review, 37(3), 406-413.

Torgerson, C. N., Love, H. A., & Vennum, A. (2018). The buffering effect of belonging on the negative association of childhood trauma with adult mental health and risky alcohol use. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 88, 44-50.

Wendt, D. C., & Gone, J. P. (2018). Complexities with group therapy facilitation in substance use disorder specialty treatment settings. Journal Of Substance Abuse Treatment, 88(1), 9-17.

Open Access Articles

Dembo, R., Faber, J., Cristiano, J., Wareham, J., Krupa, J. M., Schmeidler, J., & Terminello, A. (2018). Family Problems, Mental Health and Trauma Experiences of Justice-Involved Youth. Medical Research Archives, 6(1).

Maremmani, A. G., Maiello, M., Carbone, M. G., Pallucchini, A., Brizzi, F., Belcari, I., … & Maremmani, I. (2018). Towards a psychopathology specific to Substance Use Disorder: Should emotional responses to life events be included?. Comprehensive psychiatry, 80, 132-139.

Olney, S. (2018). Should Love Conquer Evidence in Policy‐Making? Challenges in Implementing Random Drug‐Testing of Welfare Recipients in Australia. Australian Journal of Public Administration, 77(1), 114-119.

Rossen, I., Pettigrew, S., Jongenelis, M., Stafford, J., Wakefield, M., and Chikritzhs, T. (2017). Evidence on the nature and extent of alcohol promotion and the consequences for young people’s alcohol consumption. Report prepared for the Mental Health Commission by the WA Cancer Prevention Research Unit, Curtin University School of Psychology and Speech Pathology, Perth, Western Australia.

Wiktorsson, S., Rydberg Sterner, T., Mellqvist Fässberg, M., Skoog, I., Ingeborg Berg, A., Duberstein, P., … & Waern, M. (2018). Few Sex Differences in Hospitalized Suicide Attempters Aged 70 and Above. International journal of environmental research and public health, 15(1), 141.

Open access online journal

NADA Advocate: published 4 times a years raises issues in the NSW non-government AOD sector

Open access textbooks

Lawrence, R.J. (2016). Professional Social Work in Australia

Useful resources

Language does it matter?

Produced by NADA and intended for the AOD sector, this resource provides best practice guidelines on the use of language to empower clients.

Inroads program:

Researchers from UNSW and Macquarie University developed the inroads program for young adults with concerns about their anxiety and drinking.

Over five online modules, the program will help the participant develop new skills to encourage them to think about their use of alcohol and overcome anxiety. They will be encouraged to set goals and stick to their choices. The modules are completed weekly and they will also receive phone/ email support from an experienced psychologist (copied from Inroads website)

Drug and Alcohol Research Connections Newsletter:

A joint publication of the collaborative network of alcohol and other drug research centres; National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre (NDARC) at UNSW; National Drug Research Institute (NDRI) at Curtin University; and National Centre for Education and Training on Addiction (NCETA) at Flinders University

NIDA Notes:

A monthly newsletter about drug abuse research. Articles this month include:

Long term marijuana use is associated with health problems in later life

Stressful experiences affect likelihood of remission of drug dependence, continued drug use and relapse

Substance use disorders are associated with major medical illnesses and mortality risk in a large integrated health care system

e-Book of the month

Karter, E. (2013). Women and Problem Gambling : Therapeutic Insights Into Understanding Addiction and Treatment. New York: Routledge.

Addiction is much misunderstood. Women and addictive gambling even more so, and for many years women have suffered in silence. This book explores how lonely, troubled lives and damaging relationships lead to the trap of problem gambling, the anxiety and chaos whilst locked inside, and then offers realistic hope of a way out. With the significant increase in women gambling problematically, Women and Problem Gambling aims to answer the often asked question who is to blame. The text covers: the role of the gambling industry the role of society women’s relationships with others and themselves what hitting rock bottom truly is. Case studies illustrate how gambling begins as harmless escapism and how stressful and sometimes painful lives, combined with spiralling debts, lead to desperation to avoid thoughts, feelings and the reality of life in chaos. Women can, and do, stop gambling, and the author shares anecdotes from patients, and discusses therapeutic models and practical strategies to demonstrate how this is possible. Women and Problem Gambling is based on the author’s research and theories developed throughout her extensive practice. The insights will be of value to anyone wanting to understand or work with problem gambling in women; from a woman with a problem herself, thorough to family, friends and any healthcare professionals or therapists involved in her care and treatment. (Description from EBSCO)

Free to download for all HOA staff from the library catalogue on work computers

Attend – informal learning sessions, journal club, seminar series

Insight Queensland

Free training sessions at Biala Community Health Centre in Brisbane, unless otherwise specified including:

More information and to register here

Online induction modules are a prerequisite to some of the courses. To access and download them visit http://www.insightqld.org/

 

LGBTIQ+ inclusive practice training for the AOD sector

Attend – conferences 

MyPHN Conference 2018

1-2 September, Mackay Entertainment and Convention Centre

Hosted by North Queensland Primary Health Network, this conference will bring together professionals from many streams to discuss ways to work together to improve services and outcomes

Registration $200-225

The Walk on the Wild Side (WOWS) Symposium is a one day annual convention held for people working in the AOD sector

11 May 2018, Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital.

Registration: $100-150

Write – presentations and papers

MyPHN Conference

Research findings and innovative new ideas which can inform policy, directly influence practice, inspire future research, health reform and add to the Primary Health Care (PHC) evidence base. As a contribution to fostering this impact, the Call for Abstracts asks authors to consider the contribution their work makes to policy, practice and/or research.

You can submit an abstract for the following:

• 15 minute concurrent poster presentation (10 minute presentation/5 minute Q&A)

• 20 minute concurrent plenary session

The Program Committee invites authors to submit abstracts for presentation within the program of MyPHN 2018. Submissions are sought for oral and poster presentations and can be made via the Abstract Submission Portal.

All abstracts must follow the abstract template and be submitted online by 14 June 2018. Please note that the closing date for abstract submissions will not be extended. (copied from MyPHN)

Listen – podcasts, webinars

Managing the physical health of people with co-occurring mental and substance use disorders

Insight webinars:

All at 10:00 AEST

Insight presentation recordings available now on YouTube

Assessed learning – short courses, certificates, diplomas, bachelors, post-grad

Electronic tools for use in the continuum of care for patients with addictions

This is a self-paced online course (registration with IRETA required but is free) about the use of technology throughout the continuum of care for patients with addiction. The five sections will introduce you to five different electronic tools that can be used in prevention, treatment, and aftercare.

Through this training, discover new ways to screen for drug and alcohol use, learn how technology can support cognitive behavioural therapy, and become familiar with other relevant substance use research. (copied from IRETA website)

National comorbidity guidelines free online training and website

The training program consists of 10 training modules that can be completed in any order. Registrants can choose which modules to engage in based on interest and experience. Those wishing to receive a certificate of completion must complete all modules (in any order) and successfully complete all quizzes.

At the end of each module, registrants will be presented with a quiz. All questions must be answered correctly before the module is completed, but there is no limit to how many times the quiz can be taken. Incorrect answers will refer participants to relevant sections of the Guidelines website.

At the completion of all modules, training participants will receive a certificate of completion

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April PD

You can add to the professional development post by commenting below or emailing the library.

Online resources

Webpage

Queensland Government  – Drug use: help and treatment

Read – professional reading

Available from the library database

  • Heward-Belle, S., Laing, L., Humphreys, C., & Toivonen, C. (2018). Intervening with Children Living with Domestic Violence: Is the System Safe?. Australian Social Work, 1-13.
  • Jiang, M. Y., & Vartanian, L. R. (2018). A review of existing measures of attentional biases in body image and eating disorders research. Australian Journal Of Psychology, 70(1), 3-17.
  • Kaplan, L. M., Greenfield, T. K., & Karriker‐Jaffe, K. J. (2017). Examination of associations between early life victimisation and alcohol’s harm from others. Drug and Alcohol Review.
  • Massey, S. H., Newmark, R. L., & Wakschlag, L. S. (2017). Explicating the role of empathic processes in substance use disorders: a conceptual framework and research agenda. Drug and Alcohol Review.
  • Pennay, A., McNair, R., Hughes, T. L., Leonard, W., Brown, R., & Lubman, D. I. (2018). Improving alcohol and mental health treatment for lesbian, bisexual and queer women: Identity matters. Australian And New Zealand Journal Of Public Health, 42(1), 35-42.

Open Access Articles

Open access online journal

Journal of Eating Disorders

A peer-reviewed open access journal exploring eating disorders

Open access textbooks

College open  textbooks: psychology

Useful resources

Australian College of Community Services Facebook page

ACCS is a not-for-profit Registered Training Organisation and national provider of professional development across various industries.

e-Book of the month

Howard, A., Katrak, M., Blakemore, T., & Pallas, P. (2016). Rural, Regional and Remote Social Work : Practice Research From Australia. London: Routledge.

This book gives voice to the direct practice experience of social workers working in rural and remote contexts using Australia as the primary case-study. The authors undertake a qualitative research project, conducting in-depth interviews to examine social work theory and practice against the reality of rural and remote contexts. Practice examples provide the reader with an insight into the diverse and complex nature of social work in rural and remote Australia and the role of contemporary social work. Through placing rural and remote social work in its historical, theoretical and geographical contexts, this work explores a range of considerations. These include isolation; ethical dilemmas when working with small and closely linked communities; climate, disaster relief and the environment; community identity and culture; working with indigenous communities in remote contexts; and social work education. Based on direct practice research, this book challenges existing theories of practice and reframes those to reflect the reality of practice in rural and remote communities. As social work must continue to critically reflect on its role within an ever changing and individualistic society, lessons from rural and remote settings around engagement, sense of place and skillful, innovative practice have never been more relevant. (abstract from EBSCO)

Free to download for all HOA staff from the library catalogue on work computers

Attend – informal learning sessions, journal club, seminar series

Insight Queensland

Free training sessions at Biala Community Health Centre in Brisbane, unless otherwise specified including:

  • April 6, 8:30-16:00 at Townsville: AOD Clinical assessment
  • April 17, 9:00-13:00: Crystal clear- responding to methamphetamine use
  • April 17, 9:00-16:30 at Bundaberg: AOD crash course- one day introduction to AOD
  • April 18, 9:00-16:30 at Bundaberg: Family inclusive practice in AOD treatment
  • April 24, 9:30-11:30: The problem gambling severity index- a screen for problem gambling in AOD and mental health populations
  • April 17, 9:00-16:30: Sensory approaches for AOD practice
  • April 26, 9:00-16:30 at the Gold Coast: AOD crash course- one day introduction to AOD

To register and for more details go their website

Online induction modules are a prerequisite to some of the courses. To access and download them visit www.insightqld.org

Attend – conferences 

Health in difference is Australia’s premier conference on the health and wellbeing of lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, intersex, queer and sexuality, gender, and bodily diverse people and communities throughout Australia. Held at Sydney on 11-13 April costing from $345-780 for the full conference. Program details available and include mental health issues effecting the population. Register here

Write – presentations and papers

Get your work published in the Australian Journal of Psychology. Author guidelines are available here

 Listen – podcasts, webinars

Insight webinar: Overview of the ADIS service, April 18, 10:00-11:00

The Alcohol and Drug Information Service (ADIS) has operated for over 30 years as Queensland’s 24/7 hotline for anyone experiencing issues with alcohol or other drugs and their families. This presentation outlines service directions and insights from the ADIS dataset including over 540,000 calls across 14 years of data collection.

Presented by Dr Hollie Wilson – Allied Health Manager, Alcohol and Drug Information Service

Access at www.insight.qld.edu.au and enter participant code: 52365378

Insight presentation recordings available now on YouTube

Positive Choices drug and alcohol information webinars including:

Drug and alcohol and the maturing adolescent brain

How do mental health and substance use disorders affect young people?

 Assessed learning – short courses, certificates, diplomas, bachelors, post-grad

The Absurd Word: Creative Writing for Self-Supervision

Date: 24th April 2018, 9:30-16:30, $220 before 24/03/2018 and then $240

Venue: Lighthouse Resources Upstairs Training Room, Kyabra Street RUNCORN, QLD. 4113

This workshop uses creative writing to explore the challenges and successes in your practice. You will experience Five writing exercises that support self-awareness, critical reflection and potential lightbulb moments.  You may also unearth parts of yourself you had forgotten, not been aware of or had underestimated their impact on your practice.

Register here

My Heart Art: Image Making for Self-Supervision

Date: 30th April 2018, 9:30-16:30, $230 before 30/03/2018 and then $250

Venue: Lighthouse Resources Upstairs Training Room, Kyabra Street RUNCORN, QLD. 4113

This workshop uses painting, drawing and collage to explore the emotions of working in the human services field. You will experience art based exercises that support you to be aware of the emotions of your clients and of yourself, highlighting transference, countertransference and the dynamics of your working alliance. These exercises can be used for your own continued Self-Supervision and in your work with community members.

Register here


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March PD

You can add to the professional development post by commenting below or emailing the library.

Online resources

Webpage

National Rural Health Alliance:  This site provides access to resources such as factsheets to support rural health

Read – professional reading

Available from the library database

Hyder, S., Coomber, K., Pennay, A., Droste, N., Curtis, A., Mayshak, R., & … Miller, P. G. (2018). Correlates of verbal and physical aggression among patrons of licensed venues in Australia. Drug And Alcohol Review, 37(1), 6-13.

Skerrett, D. M., Gibson, M., Darwin, L., Lewis, S., Rallah, R., & De Leo, D. (2018). Closing the Gap in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Youth Suicide: A Social–Emotional Wellbeing Service Innovation Project. Australian Psychologist, 53(1), 13-22.

Tomyn, A. J., & Weinberg, M. K. (2018). Resilience and Subjective Wellbeing: A Psychometric Evaluation in Young Australian Adults. Australian Psychologist, 53(1), 68-76.

Vo, H. T., Burgower, R., Rozenberg, I., & Fishman, M. (2018). Home-based delivery of XR-NTX in youth with opioid addiction. Journal Of Substance Abuse Treatment, 85(1), 84-89.

Yuke, K., Ford, P., Foley, W., Mutch, A., Fitzgerald, L., & Gartner, C. (2018). Australian urban Indigenous smokers’ perspectives on nicotine products and tobacco harm reduction. Drug And Alcohol Review, 37(1), 87-96.

Open Access Articles

Open access online journal

World Psychiatry: the official journal of the World Psychiatric Association

Open access textbook

Pradhan, B., Pinninti, N., & Rathod, S. (2015). Brief Interventions for Psychosis.

This book offers a clinical guide that brings together a broad range of brief interventions and their applications in treating psychosis. It describes two core approaches that can narrow the current, substantial gap between the need for psychotherapeutic interventions for all individuals suffering from psychosis, and the limited mental health resources available.The first approach involves utilizing the standard therapeutic modalities in the context of routine clinical interactions after adapting them into brief and effective formats. To that end, the book brings in experts on various psychotherapeutic modalities, who discuss how their particular modality could be adapted to more effectively fit into the existing system of care delivery.The second approach, addressed in detail, is to extend the availability of these brief interventions by utilizing the circle of providers as well as the social circle of the clients so that these interventions can be provided in a coordinated and complementary manner by psychiatrists, psychologists, clinical social workers, case managers, peer support specialists and other providers on the one hand, and by family members, friends, social and religious institutions on the other.

(Book Abstract)

e-Book of the month

Fall, K. A., & Howard, S. (2017). Alternatives to Domestic Violence : A Homework Manual for Battering Intervention Groups. New York, NY: Routledge.

This is an interactive treatment workbook designed for use with a wide variety of accepted curricula for domestic violence intervention programs. This new edition adds and revises the exercises and stories in every chapter, covering important topics such as respect and accountability, maintaining positive relationships, good communication, parenting, substance abuse, digital abuse, and sexuality. Chapters on parenting, substance abuse, and religion have also been heavily revised based on current literature and group member feedback. The chapters provide a comprehensive collection of vital topics, including topics rarely addressed in other curricula, and exercises help the group members learn new strategies for leading a life of cooperation and shared power. Continuing the tradition of past editions, this edition not only focuses on the content of a good BIPP curriculum, but it also stresses the group process elements that form the backbone of any quality approach.

(copied from EBSCO database)

Free to download for all HOA staff from the library catalogue on work computers

Attend – informal learning sessions, journal club, seminar series

Insight Queensland

Free training sessions at Biala Community Health Centre in Brisbane, unless otherwise specified including:

March 1-2: Cullturally secure AOD practice- featruring IRIS

March 2: Understanding psychoactive drugs (Townsville)

March 13: AOD crash course

March 15: Understanding psychoactive drugs

March 15: The problem gambling severity index (PGSI)

March 23: AOD clinical assessment

March 26: Young people and drugs

March 29: Harm reduction 101

More details and registration here

Online induction modules are a prerequisite to some of the courses. To access and download them visit www.insightqld.org

Turning Point seminars are online on their YouTube channel including:

Pathways out of addiction: the role of social groups and identity

Youth, moral panics and chemical cultures: a series of 4 short videos

Journal club TBA and will be on SKYPE

Attend – conferences 

QCOSS State Conference, May 16-17 at Brisbane: Movement for change. Cost $330-792 before March 16. Register here

  • Explore the current landscape in which we live and work, uncover the big issues and identify the stories that are dividing our community.
  • Develop an understanding of the evidence base for change and the current state of play from which we can move forward.
  • Explore reforms currently underway. Challenge your beliefs and attitudes and understand how these shape our actions and influence reform directions.
  • Hear from communities who have taken action, told a different story and have had success. How did they do it? What have they learned? Is this something we can all affect?
  • Learn from opinion leaders from different backgrounds and sectors who will discuss their experiences and how we can change how we think and tell our stories for the betterment of everyone.
  • Leave with an appetite and a recipe for action to take us closer to our desired future.

(QCOSS)

Listen – podcasts, webinars

Insight Qld

Free webinars on Wednesdays 10:00-11:00 (AEST).

  • March 7: AOD ‘our way’
  • March 14: Alcohol meets dementia- sorting through the maze
  • March 21: Codeine rescheduling: All you need to know but were too afraid to ask!
  • March 28: Treatment within corrections

Access at www.insight.qld.edu.au and enter participant code: 52365378

More details here

Australian and Indigenous Alcohol and Other Drugs Knowledge Centre have a selection of webinars including:

Harnessing good intentions: addressing harmful AOD use among Aboriginal Australians

A practical guide to community-based approaches for reducing alcohol harm

Assessed learning – short courses, certificates, diplomas, bachelors, post-grad

The art of CBT: Skillfully appying the manuals to common clinical problems: One day workshop:

Adelaide 18 May; Brisbane 1 June: see link for other major cities. Costs $110-455 depending on status. Register here

4 Day Intensive CBT Masterclass for AOD Professionals

Where: Melbourne,  17-20 April 2018, $990-1390

This course has been developed especially for alcohol and other drug professionals who want to build and strengthen the core CBT clinical skills that are the foundation for all best practice CBT protocols from traditional CBT to newer cognitive therapy models like the mindfulness-based therapies.

  • Get back to basics and understand exactly what makes CBT tick
  • Learn the why not just the how so you can apply core skills to any CBT type
  • Unlock the art and science of your practice to take it to the next level

Our unique interactive self-practice approach means you will really experience CBT from the inside, creating a deep understanding of how it works. Cognitive behaviour therapy is an umbrella term that includes a number of solution oriented therapies focusing on self-reflection, problem solving and learning skills that can be applied across situations:

  • Cognitive Therapy
  • Relapse Prevention
  • Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy
  • Acceptance and Commitment Therapy
  • Dialectical Behaviour Therapy
  • Compassion Focused Therapy

Find out how to use the core skills of CBT to drive change whatever model you use. Our focus is understanding and experiencing the drivers of change in CBT that underlie all CBT models. Book here

 

 

 

 www.insight.qld.edu.auwww.insight.qld.edu.au


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January Professional Development

You can add to the professional development post by commenting below or emailing the library.

Online resources

Webpage

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet contains useful resources about Indigenous health

Useful resources

Drug and Alcohol Research Connections. December 2017

NIDA Notes. The latest in NIDA drug abuse research

 Read – professional reading

Available from the library database

  • Gomes de Matos, E., Kraus, L., Hannemann, T., Soellner, R., & Piontek, D. (2017). Cross‐cultural variation in the association between family’s socioeconomic status and adolescent alcohol use. Drug and Alcohol Review, 36(6), 797-804.
  • Hallgren, K. A., Dembe, A., Pace, B. T., Imel, Z. E., Lee, C. M., & Atkins, D. C. (2018). Variability in motivational interviewing adherence across sessions, providers, sites, and research contexts. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 84(1), 30-41.
  • Harris, N., Miles, D., Howard, E., Zuchowski, I., King, J., Dhephasadin Na Ayudhaya, P., & … Puthantharayil, G. (2017). International Student Exchange in Australian Social Work Education. Australian Social Work, 70(4), 429-440.
  • Laux, J. M., DuFresne, R., Dari, T., & Juhnke, G. A. (2017). Substance Use Assessment Instruments: 13 Years Later. Journal of Addictions & Offender Counseling, 38(2), 115-124.
  • Li, W. W., & Miller, D. J. (2017). The impact of coping and resilience on anxiety among older Australians. Australian Journal of Psychology, 69(4), 263-272.

Open Access Articles

Open Access Journal

NADA Advocate is published four times a year, raises significant issues relating to the NSW non-government alcohol and other drug sector, and develops knowledge about, and connections within the sector.

 e-Book of the month

Free to download for all HOA staff from the library catalogue on work computers

Reiter, M. D. (2015). Substance Abuse and the Family. New York, NY: Routledge.

Substance Abuse and the Family demonstrates what it means to view addiction through a systems lens by considering biology and genetics, family relationships, and larger systems. Throughout the text, Michael D. Reiter shows how to examine a person’s predilection to become addicted, his or her social environment around substance use, the functionality of his or her family, and various treatment options. Chapters are organized around two sections: Assessment and Treatment. The first section pays attention to how the family system organizes around substance use and abuse. Here family roles, culture, and other issues such as family violence and resilience are covered. Two chapters are also included on the neuroscience and genetics of addiction, with contributions from Jaime L. Tartar and Christina Gobin. There are also chapters on working with partial systems, using genograms, and working in a culturally-sensitive way (with contributions from Dalis Arismendi), with culture-specific consideration paid to African American, Hispanic and Latin American, Asian American, and Native American families. The second half of the book explores what a systems orientation means in practice and goes over self-help groups for individuals and families. An overview of the major family therapy theories is included, which examines intergenerational, experiential, communication approaches, strategic, systemic, and post-modern models. A separate chapter examines issues faced by both youth and adult children of alcoholics. Intended for undergraduate and graduate students, as well as beginning practitioners, this text is one of the most penetrating and in-depth examinations on the topic available.

(copied from EBSCO site)

Attend – informal learning sessions, journal club, seminar series

National comorbidity guidelines free online training and website

The training program consists of 10 training modules that can be completed in any order. Registrants can choose which modules to engage in based on interest and experience. Those wishing to receive a certificate of completion must complete all modules (in any order) and successfully complete all quizzes.

At the end of each module, registrants will be presented with a quiz. All questions must be answered correctly before the module is completed, but there is no limit to how many times the quiz can be taken. Incorrect answers will refer participants to relevant sections of the Guidelines website.

At the completion of all modules, training participants will receive a certificate of completion.

(copied from National Comorbidity website)

Journal club TBA

Attend – conferences 

The 2018 Australian and New Zealand Addiction Conference will be held on Monday 28 and Tuesday 29 May with optional workshops on Wednesday 30 May at QT Gold Coast.

The 4th annual conference will cover a broad range of topics including prevention, treatment, systematic responses, behaviours, mental health and harm reduction in relation to all types of addiction.  Emerging trends and the various addictive habits of alcohol and other drugs, gambling and the internet are also covered.

Early bird registration from $599-899.

Write – presentations and papers

NADA invites abstract submissions for oral papers, workshops, panel presentations and poster presentations for the 2018 NADA Conference: Exploring therapeutic interventions.

This is an opportunity for you to showcase your innovative practice and research addressing the diverse and complex needs of people accessing AOD services.

Download the Call for Abstracts – information flyer for further details.

Abstracts must be submitted by Wednesday 28 February 2018 at 5pm EST to conference@nada.org.au

The NADA Conference will be held on 7-8 June 2018 at Sheraton on the Park, Sydney.

(copied from NADA website)

Listen – podcasts, webinars

Insight presentation recordings available now on YouTube

The Struggle of Mental Health TED Playlist

People who have struggled with mental illness tell their stories in this series of 10 talks.

Assessed learning – short courses, certificates, diplomas, bachelors, post-grad

Tools for Hard Conversations

Date: 11 January 2018 Facilitator: Kath Reid Workshop Duration: 1 day Workshop Time: 09:30 — 16:30 Early Bird Rate: $220.00 for registration received by 25/12/2017 Fees: $240.00 including morning tea and lunch, statement of attendance and all associated material and handouts. Workshop Venue: Lighthouse Resources Upstairs Training Room, Kyabra Street RUNCORN, QLD. 4113

(copied from Lighthouse website)

Registration/more information


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Annotated bibliography: Closing the gap in Indigenous mental health

Calma, T., Dudgeon, P., & Bray, A. (2017). Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander social and emotional wellbeing and mental health. Australian Psychologist, 52(4), 255-260.

This report identifies the large gap suffered by the Indigenous community as compared to non-Indigenous Australians. It discusses several reasons for this including the trauma of colonisation, racism, poverty, disconnection from their culture and healthcare practices that are not culturally appropriate. It emphasises that Indigenous mental health should be an approach that improves the social and emotional well-being (SEWB) of Indigenous Australians. This a more holistic and collaborative approach to health than the Western concept and it incorporates the many socio-economic factors that influence Aboriginal health with an emphasis on prevention. Community engagement, involvement and empowerment are essential components of any initiative, along with self-determination and a recognition of cultural differences.

Carey, T. A., Dudgeon, P., Hammond, S. W., Hirvonen, T., Kyrios, M., Roufeil, L., & Smith, P. (2017). The Australian Psychological Society’s apology to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Australian Psychologist, 52(4), 261-267.

This report examines the history of The Australian Psychology Society’s (APS) treatment of Aboriginal Australians. It discusses the lack of involvement of Indigenous Australians in policy and advisory roles and admits to a lack of articles in Australian Psychologist about improving Indigenous SEWB. It details the improvements it has made over the years including an Indigenous psychology group, education in culturally appropriate treatment and encouragement to Indigenous people to become psychologists. This progress culminated in an apology to the Indigenous peoples of Australian in 2016 that was well thought out, discussed, and received positive feedback from both Indigenous and professional groups. It acknowledges that it still has a way to go to bridge the gap.

Dudgeon, P., Bray, A., D’Costa, B., & Walker, R. (2017). Decolonising psychology: Validating social and emotional wellbeing. Australian Psychologist, 52(4), 316-325.

This report examines each of the seven domains, which interconnect to maintain the SEWB of Indigenous Australians. These are mind and emotions, family and kinship, community, culture, Country and spirituality. It is important that these are incorporated into any program with the aim of improving the mental health of Aboriginals. It explains how disconnect from any of these domains can be detrimental to the mental health or SEWB of each individual.

Geia, L., Pearson, L., & Sweet, M. (2017). Narratives of Twitter as a platform for professional development, innovation, and advocacy. Australian Psychologist, 52(4), 280-287.

This report examines how Twitter engagement can help to raise health professionals’ awareness of SEWB in Indigenous Australians. It utilises narrative methodology supplied by an Indigenous nurse-midwife, an Indigenous educator and a non-Indigenous journalist. Innovative platforms are developed on Twitter such as @IndigenousX which enable Indigenous people to reflect upon and discuss their SEWB. These accounts can then be followed by health professionals to gain an Indigenous perspective own health and SEWB. Indigenous people in turn benefit by having an arena for discussion and reflection. It identifies a gap in knowledge about whether psychologists are engaging in the sphere and if so are they benefitting from it?

Health, H. E., & Aboriginal. (2012). Closing the gap in a regional health service in NSW: a multistrategic approach to addressing individual and institutional racism. New South Wales Public Health Bulletin, 23(3-4), 63-67.

Hunter New England Health services the largest Aboriginal community in New South Wales. It identified problems with individual and institutional racism and culturally insensitive practices. The report details the steps it took to address these problems and thus reduce the gap in healthcare experienced by Aboriginal people. Partnerships were formed with Aboriginal groups and advice was sought from them. Three strategies were employed: staff and managerial training and education; leadership and consultation; negotiation and partnerships. It stresses the importance of ongoing commitment to address this organisational goal.

Otim, M., Kelaher, M., Anderson, I., & Doran, C. (2014). Priority setting in Indigenous health: assessing priority setting process and criteria that should guide the health system to improve Indigenous Australian health. International Journal for Equity in Health, 13(1), 1-12.

There is a large gap in health outcomes between Indigenous and other Australians, which the Australian Government has pledged to close. The objective of this study was to gauge the perceptions of Indigenous and non-Indigenous decision makers of priority setting in Indigenous healthcare. It identified an economic approach to priority setting was acceptable and useful in Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services with the potential to utilise evidence in its implementation. This use of evidence will help to maximise health outcomes for Aboriginal people thus reducing the health care gap experienced by them.

Ralph, S., & Ryan, K. (2017). Addressing the mental health gap in working with Indigenous youth: Some considerations for non‐Indigenous psychologists working with Indigenous youth. Australian Psychologist, 52(4), 288-298.

Indigenous youth between the ages of 15-24 are recognised as one of the most disadvantaged and vulnerable groups in Australia. The article reviews the current knowledge about the mental health needs and SEWB of this group. Psychological strategies such as the Access to Allied Psychological Services program are examined as to their relevance and effectiveness. It identifies that whilst Indigenous mental health workers are the ideal, but due to a lack of a skilled and available workforce who are able to deal with the complexity of needs in this client group, non-Indigenous psychologists need to be used. It does however confirm that the psychologist needs to be culturally aware of the needs of the youth in order to engage with them and successfully manage their treatment.

Smith, S., O’Grady, L., Cubillo, C., & Cavanagh, S. (2017). Using culturally appropriate approaches to the development of KidsMatter resources to support the social and emotional wellbeing of Aboriginal children. Australian Psychologist, 52(4), 299-305.

KidsMatter is an Australian initiative aimed at improving the mental health of young children in primary school and early childhood centres. A need for resources aimed at improving the SEWB of Aboriginal children was identified. The report details the development of this project. The project utilised participatory action, narrative therapy and critically reflective practice to define the Aboriginal perspective of SEWB. Aboriginal cultural consultants worked collaboratively with schools, health professionals and members of the Aboriginal community to develop culturally appropriate and effective resources. This resulted in a collection of culturally appropriate and professional learning tools to use in the promotion of SEWB for Aboriginal children.

Togni, S. J. (2017). The Uti Kulintjaku Project: The path to clear thinking. An evaluation of an innovative, Aboriginal‐Led approach to developing bi‐cultural understanding of mental health and wellbeing. Australian Psychologist, 52(4), 268-279.

Uti kulintjaku (UK) means to think and understand clearly and the objective of the project was to strengthen the understanding of mental health between Aboriginal people and non-Aboriginal health professionals. This project examined an innovative approach to bridging the gap between Western health care and traditional Indigenous care. It involved a group of senior Indigenous women working collaboratively with non-Indigenous health care professionals, all of whom had substantial experience in working in Indigenous communities. The aim was bridge any misunderstandings caused by language differences and improve the SEWB of the community. The woman who participated in the project have become empowered as a team and have learnt a lot about themselves, whilst increasing their self-confidence. The use of culture has reinvigorated cultural knowledge and several posters were developed which can be used in the future. Discussion in the community about mental health and finding new ways to tackle it and work with mental health services to enhance SEWB has increased. The tenets of the project of promoting healing and empowerment of individuals and groups were critical to the success of the project. It began as a language project but developed into increased shared understanding and it demonstrated the importance of traditional cultural methods such as story-telling and art in the healing process.

Postscript

These resources are all available to Healthy Options Australia employees, student and volunteers from the library database. Please email the library if you experience any problems in accessing them.

library@hoa.org.au


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July PD

You can add to the professional development post by commenting below or emailing the library.

Online resources

Read – professional reading

Available from the library database

Clough, A., Margolis, S., Miller, A., Shakeshaft, A., Doran, C., McDermott, R., & … West, C. (2017). Alcohol management plans in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous) Australian communities in Queensland: community residents have experienced favourable impacts but also suffered unfavourable ones. BMC Public Health, 17(1), 1-14.

Degenhardt, L., Sara, G., McKetin, R., Roxburgh, A., Dobbins, T., Farrell, M., & … Hall, W. D. (2017). Crystalline methamphetamine use and methamphetamine‐related harms in Australia. Drug And Alcohol Review, 36(2), 160-170.

Jakobsen, H., Andersson, G., Havik, O. E., & Nordgreen, T. (2017). Guided Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy for mild and moderate depression: A benchmarking study. Internet Interventions, 7(1), 1-8.

Tolou-Shams, M., Dauria, E., Conrad, S. M., Kemp, K., Johnson, S., & Brown, L. K. (2017). Outcomes of a family-based HIV prevention intervention for substance using juvenile offenders. Journal Of Substance Abuse Treatment, 77(1), 115-125.

 

Open Access Articles

 

 

Open access online journal

Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health

Useful resources

NCETA’s Ice Training for Frontline Workers

A free comprehensive evidence based resource. NCETA continues to update and expand the resource, and Centre staff are working on a series of customised topics to address the professional development needs of specific workforces. These include the following customised topics which will be added to the resource in the next few months:

  • Working with families in which methamphetamine use is a problem
  • Working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People and Communities
  • Recovery-focused support.

Drug and alcohol research connections

A joint publication of the collaborative network of alcohol and other drug research centres; National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre (NDARC) at UNSW; National Drug Research Institute (NDRI) at Curtin University; and National Centre for Education and Training on Addiction (NCETA) at Flinders University.

e-Book of the month

Bhatia, S. C., Petty, F., & Gabel, T. (2017). Substance and Nonsubstance Related Addiction Disorder: Diagnosis and Treatment. [S.l.]: Bentham Science Publishers Ltd.

Substance and Non substance Related Addiction Disorders: Diagnosis and Treatment is an accessible handbook about the two main types of addiction disorders. It is divided into three sections which cover 1) the scientific underpinnings of addiction disorders (neurobiology, addiction neural reward pathways, genetic and psychosocial basis of addiction, screening and treatment), 2) information about substances commonly used by addicts (pharmacology, diagnostics and treatment considerations) and 3) current understandings of the diagnosis and treatment of behavioral problems (such as gambling), respectively. Key features: -covers both substance abuse and behavioral problems -uses a reader friendly format with a patient education handout style -includes key learning points listed in each chapter -includes clinical vignettes which outline brief history, evaluation, diagnostic considerations with successful pharmacological, psychological and social interventions -includes references in each chapter The handbook meets the information needs of medical students and professionals (family physicians, nurses, addiction therapists, psychiatry residents, and other health care professionals) interested in the primary care of patients afflicted with addiction disorders.Subjects:Substance abuse–Treatment

Free to download for all HOA staff from the EBSCO Host platform on work computers

Attend – informal learning sessions, journal club, seminar series

Alcohol and other drug treatment in prison

Presenter: Michael Doyle, University of Sydney

Thursday, 6 July 2017 @ 2pm-3pm

This Aboriginal-led PhD project investigated the experiences of 31 men (14 Aboriginal and 17 non-Aboriginal) of prison-based AoD treatment programs. The results and findings for this research will be reported in this presentation, which will also include findings from a systematic review of international peer-reviewed literature in prison-based AoD treatment research. Cost: free of charge

 Venue and full details

RSVP: ndriau@curtin.edu.au

 

Insight Queensland

Free training session at Biala Community Health Centre in Brisbane:

Culturally secure AOD practice featuring IRIS

This updated 2-day workshop aims to build cultural capacity when working with Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people who use substances. Designed for both Indigenous and non-Indigenous workers alike, the course promotes a culturally-secure AOD framework and approach to direct practice.

Participants will learn how to use the Indigenous Risk Impact Screen (IRIS) and associated brief intervention tools alongside other practical tips, tricks, tools and resources for use in everyday practice.

Dates 4-5/07/2017 9-4pm

Register here

Online induction modules are a prerequisite to some of the courses. To access and download them visit www.insightqld.org

Attend – conferences 

APSAD Scientific Alcohol and Drugs Conference, Melbourne, 12-15 November 2017.

No details on program as yet.

Registration between $540-1170 for the full conference, depnding when you register and your professional status

Write – presentations and papers

ATCA Conference –  Brisbane from 31 October to 3 November 2017.

Information will be posted on the ATCA website in the coming days, and registrations will be open this week.  There will be site visits to TCs on the Gold Coast (Goldbridge and Fairhaven), the Sunshine Coast (WHOS Najara) and Brisbane (Logan House and Moonyah) on Tuesday 31 November, followed by the conference program on Wednesday-Friday and concluding with interactive workshops on Friday afternoon (3 November).

A Call for Abstracts has now gone out and submissions close on Friday 25 August 2017 in the following themes:

ATCA recognises that not all innovation comes from research but from the need to tackle a persistent problem, using creativity, imagination and ingenuity. If you have a story, message or anecdote to share, then share your work and ideas with them. Conference Themes include:

  • TC practice: Partnerships for new ideas and new initiatives
  • Cultural partnerships: working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander, Mãori and Pasifika peoples
  • Working with Families: Family involvement in treatment, interventions for children affected by parental substance use and associated issues
  • Continuing care: Re-thinking community partnerships
  • Co-morbidity: Best practice for people with co-occurring AOD and mental health issues
  • Corrective services and coerced clients: Working collaboratively with our partners in the justice system
  • Attachment and Trauma: Interventions and recovery

Applications will be assessed on the following criteria:

  • The relevance of the abstract to the themes
  • The validity of the evidence on which the presentation is based
  • The implications for practitioners implementing the findings
  • The relevance of innovative programmes to other practitioners in the field.

Presenters are required to register for the Australasian Therapeutic Communities Conference. 

Presentation Types:

Oral Presentation: These will take place in chaired sessions and are 15 minutes in length plus 5 minutes question time. 

Poster display: poster presentations are visual displays used to communicate a message i.e. research findings, program highlights, etc. Poster presenters will be provided with maximum coverage through dedicated poster sessions during which time presenters are required to stand by their posters. This provides an intimate forum for the exchange of information by allowing more personal discussion between presenter and audience.  Posters may be in a traditional format, or as a  Powerpoint presentation on a continuous loop on the presenter’s own laptop.

Participatory workshop: There is the opportunity for half-day workshops on Friday afternoon (3 November) to encourage the interactive transfer of skills and practical solutions to common problems or specific themes.

Project Snapshot: Each project snapshot will be allocated 10-minute oral presentation time with the use of audio-visual equipment if desired and four minutes of questions.

Seminar: Several presenters are encouraged to submit a group of abstracts on a specific topic and share a 90-minute presentation time as they explore the topic in depth. These sessions will be led by a facilitator.

Yarning Circle: The Circle will be permanently accessible as a Cultural Space as well as having times for organised sessions during the conference gathering. These sessions will be led by a main presenter, or group of presenters, and be approximately one hour in duration with the opportunity for multiple speakers on given themes.

Yarning is an informal conversation that is culturally friendly and recognised by Aboriginal people as meaning to talk about something, someone or provide and receive information (Dawn Bessarab, 2012).  In the conference context, it is a place where all people can have a casual or deep conversation about something or anything. The truth is always spoken in a yarning circle. Yarning circles are designed so that everyone has an opportunity to contribute in a safe and respectful setting. The yarning circle will have a few main speakers to lead discussion however, all attendees are encouraged to participate in the conversation if they feel comfortable.

Submit your abstracts to atca@atca.com.au

Listen – podcasts, webinars

Alcohol and mental health podcast

Alcohol use disorder is often co-morbid with a variety of mental health conditions. It can be challenging for clinicians to tease out which of these conditions are primary, with alcohol being used as an attempt to alleviate symptoms, and which of these are secondary to the physiological and psychosocial impacts of alcohol itself.  (50 minutes duration)

Access here

Watch – videos

First time with a new pill or powder: This short video published back in 2013 from Global Drug Survey called “First time with a new pill or powder”, provides common sense harm reduction information for people who use or are planning to experiment with pills or powders as these substances can sometimes cause significant harm.

 

 


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Book of the month: March

We’ve decided to run a book of the month club in order to highlight our e-book collection. All the books featured are available to download and read on HOA computers from our library catalogue. If you’re having trouble accessing them please contact your librarian for assistance. To make it more like a real book club we would love comments on this post when you’ve read it or suggestions for future featured titles. This month’s book is a nice short one of 50 pages to ease you in gently:

Parental drug and alcohol use: resilience and transition amongst young people by Angus Bancroft et al (2004)

This is a short snappy book that examines the effects on children of growing up with parents or carers who misuse alcohol or other drugs from their perspective as young adults. It includes several narratives from the young people, which made it an interesting and insightful read. It also includes background material throughout the book written by the authors, which is easy to read and digest. The book concludes with a discussion which succinctly summarises the contents. It was interesting to note how diverse the narratives were whilst still maintaining a similar underlying thread. It was a very moving read, made more so by how optimistic many of the subjects remained despite their childhoods.