HOA LIBRARY


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May PD

You can add to the professional development post by commenting below or emailing the library.

Online resources

Read – professional reading

Available from the library database

Geerlings, L. R., Thompson, C. L., Bouma, R., & Hawkins, R. (2018). Cultural Competence in Clinical Psychology Training: A Qualitative Investigation of Student and Academic Experiences. Australian Psychologist, 53(2), 161-170.

Massey, S. H., Newmark, R. L., & Wakschlag, L. S. (2018). Explicating the role of empathic processes in substance use disorders: A conceptual framework and research agenda. Drug And Alcohol Review, 37(3), 316-332.

Rychert, M., Wilkins, C., Parker, K., & Witten, K. (2018). Are government‐approved products containing new psychoactive substances perceived to be safer and more socially acceptable than alcohol, tobacco and illegal drugs? Findings from a survey of police arrestees in New Zealand. Drug And Alcohol Review, 37(3), 406-413.

Torgerson, C. N., Love, H. A., & Vennum, A. (2018). The buffering effect of belonging on the negative association of childhood trauma with adult mental health and risky alcohol use. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 88, 44-50.

Wendt, D. C., & Gone, J. P. (2018). Complexities with group therapy facilitation in substance use disorder specialty treatment settings. Journal Of Substance Abuse Treatment, 88(1), 9-17.

Open Access Articles

Dembo, R., Faber, J., Cristiano, J., Wareham, J., Krupa, J. M., Schmeidler, J., & Terminello, A. (2018). Family Problems, Mental Health and Trauma Experiences of Justice-Involved Youth. Medical Research Archives, 6(1).

Maremmani, A. G., Maiello, M., Carbone, M. G., Pallucchini, A., Brizzi, F., Belcari, I., … & Maremmani, I. (2018). Towards a psychopathology specific to Substance Use Disorder: Should emotional responses to life events be included?. Comprehensive psychiatry, 80, 132-139.

Olney, S. (2018). Should Love Conquer Evidence in Policy‐Making? Challenges in Implementing Random Drug‐Testing of Welfare Recipients in Australia. Australian Journal of Public Administration, 77(1), 114-119.

Rossen, I., Pettigrew, S., Jongenelis, M., Stafford, J., Wakefield, M., and Chikritzhs, T. (2017). Evidence on the nature and extent of alcohol promotion and the consequences for young people’s alcohol consumption. Report prepared for the Mental Health Commission by the WA Cancer Prevention Research Unit, Curtin University School of Psychology and Speech Pathology, Perth, Western Australia.

Wiktorsson, S., Rydberg Sterner, T., Mellqvist Fässberg, M., Skoog, I., Ingeborg Berg, A., Duberstein, P., … & Waern, M. (2018). Few Sex Differences in Hospitalized Suicide Attempters Aged 70 and Above. International journal of environmental research and public health, 15(1), 141.

Open access online journal

NADA Advocate: published 4 times a years raises issues in the NSW non-government AOD sector

Open access textbooks

Lawrence, R.J. (2016). Professional Social Work in Australia

Useful resources

Language does it matter?

Produced by NADA and intended for the AOD sector, this resource provides best practice guidelines on the use of language to empower clients.

Inroads program:

Researchers from UNSW and Macquarie University developed the inroads program for young adults with concerns about their anxiety and drinking.

Over five online modules, the program will help the participant develop new skills to encourage them to think about their use of alcohol and overcome anxiety. They will be encouraged to set goals and stick to their choices. The modules are completed weekly and they will also receive phone/ email support from an experienced psychologist (copied from Inroads website)

Drug and Alcohol Research Connections Newsletter:

A joint publication of the collaborative network of alcohol and other drug research centres; National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre (NDARC) at UNSW; National Drug Research Institute (NDRI) at Curtin University; and National Centre for Education and Training on Addiction (NCETA) at Flinders University

NIDA Notes:

A monthly newsletter about drug abuse research. Articles this month include:

Long term marijuana use is associated with health problems in later life

Stressful experiences affect likelihood of remission of drug dependence, continued drug use and relapse

Substance use disorders are associated with major medical illnesses and mortality risk in a large integrated health care system

e-Book of the month

Karter, E. (2013). Women and Problem Gambling : Therapeutic Insights Into Understanding Addiction and Treatment. New York: Routledge.

Addiction is much misunderstood. Women and addictive gambling even more so, and for many years women have suffered in silence. This book explores how lonely, troubled lives and damaging relationships lead to the trap of problem gambling, the anxiety and chaos whilst locked inside, and then offers realistic hope of a way out. With the significant increase in women gambling problematically, Women and Problem Gambling aims to answer the often asked question who is to blame. The text covers: the role of the gambling industry the role of society women’s relationships with others and themselves what hitting rock bottom truly is. Case studies illustrate how gambling begins as harmless escapism and how stressful and sometimes painful lives, combined with spiralling debts, lead to desperation to avoid thoughts, feelings and the reality of life in chaos. Women can, and do, stop gambling, and the author shares anecdotes from patients, and discusses therapeutic models and practical strategies to demonstrate how this is possible. Women and Problem Gambling is based on the author’s research and theories developed throughout her extensive practice. The insights will be of value to anyone wanting to understand or work with problem gambling in women; from a woman with a problem herself, thorough to family, friends and any healthcare professionals or therapists involved in her care and treatment. (Description from EBSCO)

Free to download for all HOA staff from the library catalogue on work computers

Attend – informal learning sessions, journal club, seminar series

Insight Queensland

Free training sessions at Biala Community Health Centre in Brisbane, unless otherwise specified including:

More information and to register here

Online induction modules are a prerequisite to some of the courses. To access and download them visit http://www.insightqld.org/

 

LGBTIQ+ inclusive practice training for the AOD sector

Attend – conferences 

MyPHN Conference 2018

1-2 September, Mackay Entertainment and Convention Centre

Hosted by North Queensland Primary Health Network, this conference will bring together professionals from many streams to discuss ways to work together to improve services and outcomes

Registration $200-225

The Walk on the Wild Side (WOWS) Symposium is a one day annual convention held for people working in the AOD sector

11 May 2018, Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital.

Registration: $100-150

Write – presentations and papers

MyPHN Conference

Research findings and innovative new ideas which can inform policy, directly influence practice, inspire future research, health reform and add to the Primary Health Care (PHC) evidence base. As a contribution to fostering this impact, the Call for Abstracts asks authors to consider the contribution their work makes to policy, practice and/or research.

You can submit an abstract for the following:

• 15 minute concurrent poster presentation (10 minute presentation/5 minute Q&A)

• 20 minute concurrent plenary session

The Program Committee invites authors to submit abstracts for presentation within the program of MyPHN 2018. Submissions are sought for oral and poster presentations and can be made via the Abstract Submission Portal.

All abstracts must follow the abstract template and be submitted online by 14 June 2018. Please note that the closing date for abstract submissions will not be extended. (copied from MyPHN)

Listen – podcasts, webinars

Managing the physical health of people with co-occurring mental and substance use disorders

Insight webinars:

All at 10:00 AEST

Insight presentation recordings available now on YouTube

Assessed learning – short courses, certificates, diplomas, bachelors, post-grad

Electronic tools for use in the continuum of care for patients with addictions

This is a self-paced online course (registration with IRETA required but is free) about the use of technology throughout the continuum of care for patients with addiction. The five sections will introduce you to five different electronic tools that can be used in prevention, treatment, and aftercare.

Through this training, discover new ways to screen for drug and alcohol use, learn how technology can support cognitive behavioural therapy, and become familiar with other relevant substance use research. (copied from IRETA website)

National comorbidity guidelines free online training and website

The training program consists of 10 training modules that can be completed in any order. Registrants can choose which modules to engage in based on interest and experience. Those wishing to receive a certificate of completion must complete all modules (in any order) and successfully complete all quizzes.

At the end of each module, registrants will be presented with a quiz. All questions must be answered correctly before the module is completed, but there is no limit to how many times the quiz can be taken. Incorrect answers will refer participants to relevant sections of the Guidelines website.

At the completion of all modules, training participants will receive a certificate of completion

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April PD

You can add to the professional development post by commenting below or emailing the library.

Online resources

Webpage

Queensland Government  – Drug use: help and treatment

Read – professional reading

Available from the library database

  • Heward-Belle, S., Laing, L., Humphreys, C., & Toivonen, C. (2018). Intervening with Children Living with Domestic Violence: Is the System Safe?. Australian Social Work, 1-13.
  • Jiang, M. Y., & Vartanian, L. R. (2018). A review of existing measures of attentional biases in body image and eating disorders research. Australian Journal Of Psychology, 70(1), 3-17.
  • Kaplan, L. M., Greenfield, T. K., & Karriker‐Jaffe, K. J. (2017). Examination of associations between early life victimisation and alcohol’s harm from others. Drug and Alcohol Review.
  • Massey, S. H., Newmark, R. L., & Wakschlag, L. S. (2017). Explicating the role of empathic processes in substance use disorders: a conceptual framework and research agenda. Drug and Alcohol Review.
  • Pennay, A., McNair, R., Hughes, T. L., Leonard, W., Brown, R., & Lubman, D. I. (2018). Improving alcohol and mental health treatment for lesbian, bisexual and queer women: Identity matters. Australian And New Zealand Journal Of Public Health, 42(1), 35-42.

Open Access Articles

Open access online journal

Journal of Eating Disorders

A peer-reviewed open access journal exploring eating disorders

Open access textbooks

College open  textbooks: psychology

Useful resources

Australian College of Community Services Facebook page

ACCS is a not-for-profit Registered Training Organisation and national provider of professional development across various industries.

e-Book of the month

Howard, A., Katrak, M., Blakemore, T., & Pallas, P. (2016). Rural, Regional and Remote Social Work : Practice Research From Australia. London: Routledge.

This book gives voice to the direct practice experience of social workers working in rural and remote contexts using Australia as the primary case-study. The authors undertake a qualitative research project, conducting in-depth interviews to examine social work theory and practice against the reality of rural and remote contexts. Practice examples provide the reader with an insight into the diverse and complex nature of social work in rural and remote Australia and the role of contemporary social work. Through placing rural and remote social work in its historical, theoretical and geographical contexts, this work explores a range of considerations. These include isolation; ethical dilemmas when working with small and closely linked communities; climate, disaster relief and the environment; community identity and culture; working with indigenous communities in remote contexts; and social work education. Based on direct practice research, this book challenges existing theories of practice and reframes those to reflect the reality of practice in rural and remote communities. As social work must continue to critically reflect on its role within an ever changing and individualistic society, lessons from rural and remote settings around engagement, sense of place and skillful, innovative practice have never been more relevant. (abstract from EBSCO)

Free to download for all HOA staff from the library catalogue on work computers

Attend – informal learning sessions, journal club, seminar series

Insight Queensland

Free training sessions at Biala Community Health Centre in Brisbane, unless otherwise specified including:

  • April 6, 8:30-16:00 at Townsville: AOD Clinical assessment
  • April 17, 9:00-13:00: Crystal clear- responding to methamphetamine use
  • April 17, 9:00-16:30 at Bundaberg: AOD crash course- one day introduction to AOD
  • April 18, 9:00-16:30 at Bundaberg: Family inclusive practice in AOD treatment
  • April 24, 9:30-11:30: The problem gambling severity index- a screen for problem gambling in AOD and mental health populations
  • April 17, 9:00-16:30: Sensory approaches for AOD practice
  • April 26, 9:00-16:30 at the Gold Coast: AOD crash course- one day introduction to AOD

To register and for more details go their website

Online induction modules are a prerequisite to some of the courses. To access and download them visit www.insightqld.org

Attend – conferences 

Health in difference is Australia’s premier conference on the health and wellbeing of lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, intersex, queer and sexuality, gender, and bodily diverse people and communities throughout Australia. Held at Sydney on 11-13 April costing from $345-780 for the full conference. Program details available and include mental health issues effecting the population. Register here

Write – presentations and papers

Get your work published in the Australian Journal of Psychology. Author guidelines are available here

 Listen – podcasts, webinars

Insight webinar: Overview of the ADIS service, April 18, 10:00-11:00

The Alcohol and Drug Information Service (ADIS) has operated for over 30 years as Queensland’s 24/7 hotline for anyone experiencing issues with alcohol or other drugs and their families. This presentation outlines service directions and insights from the ADIS dataset including over 540,000 calls across 14 years of data collection.

Presented by Dr Hollie Wilson – Allied Health Manager, Alcohol and Drug Information Service

Access at www.insight.qld.edu.au and enter participant code: 52365378

Insight presentation recordings available now on YouTube

Positive Choices drug and alcohol information webinars including:

Drug and alcohol and the maturing adolescent brain

How do mental health and substance use disorders affect young people?

 Assessed learning – short courses, certificates, diplomas, bachelors, post-grad

The Absurd Word: Creative Writing for Self-Supervision

Date: 24th April 2018, 9:30-16:30, $220 before 24/03/2018 and then $240

Venue: Lighthouse Resources Upstairs Training Room, Kyabra Street RUNCORN, QLD. 4113

This workshop uses creative writing to explore the challenges and successes in your practice. You will experience Five writing exercises that support self-awareness, critical reflection and potential lightbulb moments.  You may also unearth parts of yourself you had forgotten, not been aware of or had underestimated their impact on your practice.

Register here

My Heart Art: Image Making for Self-Supervision

Date: 30th April 2018, 9:30-16:30, $230 before 30/03/2018 and then $250

Venue: Lighthouse Resources Upstairs Training Room, Kyabra Street RUNCORN, QLD. 4113

This workshop uses painting, drawing and collage to explore the emotions of working in the human services field. You will experience art based exercises that support you to be aware of the emotions of your clients and of yourself, highlighting transference, countertransference and the dynamics of your working alliance. These exercises can be used for your own continued Self-Supervision and in your work with community members.

Register here


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November PD

You can add to the professional development post by commenting below or emailing the library.

Online resources

Webpage

FASD Hub Australia: information on Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) for Australian health professionals, teachers, justice professionals, service providers, researchers or parents and carers.

Read – professional reading

Available from the library database

  • Deacon, R. M., & Mooney‐Somers, J. (2017). Smoking prevalence among lesbian, bisexual and queer women in Sydney remains high: Analysis of trends and correlates. Drug And Alcohol Review, 36(4), 546-554.
  • Holzhauer, C. G., Epstein, E. E., Hayaki, J., Marinchak, J. S., McCrady, B. S., & Cook, S. M. (2017). Moderators of sudden gains after sessions addressing emotion regulation among women in treatment for alcohol use. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment.
  • Hyshka, E., Anderson, J. T., & Wild, T. C. (2017). Perceived unmet need and barriers to care amongst street‐involved people who use illicit drugs. Drug And Alcohol Review, 36(3), 295-304
  • McPherson, L. (2017). Kinship Care: Increasing Child Well-being through Practice, Policy and Research. Australian Social Work, 70(4), 515-516.

  • Tarzia, L., Maxwell, S., Valpied, J., Novy, K., Quake, R., & Hegarty, K. (2017). Sexual violence associated with poor mental health in women attending Australian general practices. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 41(5), 518-523.

 

Open Access Articles

Reports

Useful resource

Australian Government Head to Health: National mental health portal

e-Book of the month

Crittenden, P. M. (2014). Attachment and Family Therapy. Maidenhead, Berkshire: McGraw-Hill Education

This book explores an integration of ideas from attachment theory and systemic family therapy including current developments and integrated cases.

Free to download for all HOA staff from the library catalogue on work computers

Attend – informal learning sessions, journal club, seminar series

Insight Queensland

Free training sessions at Biala Community Health Centre in Brisbane, unless otherwise specified including:

  • Introduction to motivational interviewing for AOD use – Cairns 01/12/2017, 09:00-16:30.  Prerequisite online induction material module 5
  • AOD relapse prevention and management –  Townsville 10/11/2017; Cairns 27/11/2017, 09:00-16:30. Prerequisite online induction material module 6
  • Advanced harm reduction including safer injecting practices – Brisbane 28/11/2107, 09:00-16:30
  • Culturally secure AOD practice featuring IRIS (2 day workshop) – Brisbane 20/11/2107 – 21/11/2017, 09:00-16:30
  • Crystal clear: responding to methamphetamine use – Brisbane 02/11/2017, 09:00-13:00

Workshops can be either attended in person or via webinar. For more details and to register click here

For Townsville workshops please contact the Mental Health Staff Development Team on (07) 4433 9480 or email MHCAMB@health.qld.gov.au for workshop information

For Cairns please contact Jennifer.Brazier@health.qld.gov.au for workshop information

Online induction modules are a prerequisite to some of the courses. To access and download them visit www.insightqld.org

Attend – conferences 

APSAD Scientific Alcohol and Drug Conference, Pullman Melbourne Albert Park. 12-15 November 2017

Full program now available

Registration from $460 – $1070. Online registrations are now closed, contact the conference secretariat: asadconference@ashm.org.au or 02 8204 0770 

Write – presentations and papers

Get your research published. The Drug an Alcohol Review have published guidelines for authors

Listen – podcasts, webinars

Insight Qld

Free webinars on Wednesdays 10:00-11:00 (AEST). Access here

  • 01/11/2017: New services for comorbidity – Addiction and Mental Health Short Stay Unit (Dr Shaladran Padayachee and Staff, Addiction and Mental Health Short Stay Unit – Logan Hospital)
  • 08/11/2017: Smoking Cessation Clinical Pathway Project: A new approach (Natalie Davis, Health Promotion Officer – Addiction Services, PAH; Deepali Gupta, Senior Pharmacist – Preventative Team PAH)
  • 15/11/2017: Treating eating disorders made easy (Associate Professor Warren Ward, Director – QuEDS)
  • 22/11/2017: Alt-truth and the post truth world. Where does AOD evidence fit in Trump’s universe? (Dr Jeremy Hayllar, Clinical Director, Metro North Mental Health – Alcohol & Drug Service)

More details here

Assessed learning – short courses, certificates, diplomas, bachelors, post-grad

Psychological First Aid

Learn to provide psychological first aid to people in an emergency by employing the RAPID model: Reflective listening, Assessment of needs, Prioritization, Intervention, and Disposition.

This is a free self-directed online course offered by John Hopkins University, delivered over 5 weeks. It costs 61 USD if you require a certificate. For more details and to enroll click here


Leave a comment

September PD

You can add to the professional development post by commenting below or emailing the library.

Online resources

Webpage

Youth AOD toolbox: The latest evidence and theory on adolescent development and substance use, behaviour change, building resilience, supporting recovery and simultaneously addressing the determinants of AOD problems

Read – professional reading

Available from the library database

Chapman, A. R., & Babor, T. F. (2017). Duterte’s War on Drugs and the Silence of the Addiction Science Community. Journal Of Studies On Alcohol And Drugs, 78(4), 491-493.

Graham, V. E., Campbell, S., West, C., & Clough, A. R. (2017). Substance misuse intervention research in remote Indigenous Australian communities since the NHMRC ‘Roadmap’. Australian And New Zealand Journal Of Public Health, 41(4), 424-431.

Ralph, S., & Ryan, K. (2017). Addressing the Mental Health Gap in Working with Indigenous Youth: Some Considerations for Non‐Indigenous Psychologists Working with Indigenous Youth. Australian Psychologist, 52(4), 288-298.

Simoneau, H., Kamgang, E., Tremblay, J., Bertrand, K., Brochu, S., and Fleury, M.-J. (2017) Efficacy of extensive intervention models for substance use disorders: A systematic review. Drug and Alcohol Review

Yurasek, A. M., Merrill, J. E., Metrik, J., Miller, M. B., Fernandez, A. C., & Borsari, B. (2017). Marijuana use in the context of alcohol interventions for mandated college students. Journal Of Substance Abuse Treatment, 79(1), 53-60.

Open Access Articles

 

Open access textbook

Open access online journal

Addiction Science & Clinical Practice

e-Book of the month

Van Dijk, S. (2012). DBT Made Simple : A Step-by-Step Guide to Dialectical Behavior Therapy. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications

Originally developed for the treatment of borderline personality disorder, dialectical behavior therapy, or DBT, has rapidly become one of the most popular and most effective treatments for all mental health conditions rooted in out-of-control emotions. However, there are limited resources for psychologists seeking to use DBT skills with individual clients. In the tradition of ACT Made Simple, DBT Made Simple provides clinicians with everything they need to know to start using DBT in the therapy room. The first part of this book briefly covers the theory and research behind DBT and explains how DBT differs from traditional cognitive behavioral therapy approaches. The second part focuses on strategies professionals can use in individual client sessions, while the third section teaches the four skills modules that form the backbone of DBT: core mindfulness, distress tolerance, emotion regulation, and interpersonal effectiveness. The book includes handouts, case examples, and example therapist-client dialogue—everything clinicians need to equip their clients with these effective and life-changing skills.

Free to download for all HOA staff from the library catalogue on work computers

Attend – informal learning sessions, journal club, seminar series

Insight Queensland

Free training sessions at Biala Community Health Centre in Brisbane, unless otherwise specified including:

Micro-counselling and brief interventions 7th September 09:00-16:30

In the counselling environment, a well-established therapeutic relationship provides the necessary foundation for delivering a wide range of treatment interventions that enhance treatment outcomes.

In the AOD counselling environment, brief interventions are often delivered opportunistically to raise a client’s awareness of some of the issues associated with their AOD use. A sound skill in the use of micro-counselling skills can build a strong therapeutic relationship that thereby facilitates clients’ optimal receipt of treatment for problematic AOD use.

AOD Clinical Assessment 8th September (Townsville); 14th September (Brisbane); 18th September (Cairns) 09:00-16:30

Prerequisite: Online Induction Material – Module 4

This interactive workshop introduces participants to clinical assessment for alcohol and other drug problems.

Topics covered include:

• raising the issue of alcohol and other drug use with clients

• screening instruments

• assessment instruments

• bio-psychosocial elements of assessment

• situational alcohol and other drug risks

• practical skill development exercises.

Understanding psychoactive drugs 15th September (Cairns) 09:00-16:30

Prerequisite: Online Induction Material – Module 2

This workshop is designed for those wanting to gain a basic understanding of what psychoactive drugs are and the various licit and illicit substances used in Australia today.

The workshop also covers:

• classification and effects of psychoactive drugs (including street names for commonly used drugs)

• patterns of use and harms from substance use

• basic neurobiology

• intoxication and overdose

• tolerance and withdrawal

• pharmacotherapies currently available

Presenters: Jeff Buckley and Damien Martin

Culturally secure AOD practice 19th-20th September (Cairns); 25th-26th September (Brisbane) 09:00-16:30

This updated 2-day workshop aims to build cultural capacity when working with Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people who use substances. Designed for both Indigenous and non-Indigenous workers alike, the course promotes a culturally-secure AOD framework and approach to direct practice.
Participants will learn how to use the Indigenous Risk Impact Screen (IRIS) and associated brief intervention tools alongside other practical tips, tricks, tools and resources for use in everyday practice.

Presenters: Damien Martin

Online induction modules are a prerequisite to some of the courses. To access and download them visit www.insightqld.org

Attend – conferences 

Changing the Game: 30 years of Drug and Alcohol Research

National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre: Sydney October 3rd and 4th

Examining the changes that have occurred in the last 30 years and presenting cutting edge research, treatment prevention and epidemiology. To register and for more details click here.

Cost $250-500

https://ndarc.med.unsw.edu.au/content/2017-ndarc-annual-research-symposium

Listen – podcasts, webinars

How to support families and friends with a loved one using methamphetamine

4th September 1:00-2:00 AEST

This webinar will provide attendees with information on recent trends in use of the drug ice in Australia, and introduces a new online toolkit providing evidence-based information for the Australian community. Funded by the Australian Government Department of Health, the Cracks in the Ice online toolkit was developed with input from community members and researchers across Australia. It includes information for health professionals, families and friends of people using ice, teachers, and general community members. Expected benefits of participating in this webinar include:

• Increased awareness of changing patterns of ice use in Australia

• Increased understanding of the role community members and health professionals can play in becoming more informed about the drug ice

• Increased knowledge about where to access evidence-based information, resources and support related to ice.

Register here

Insight QLD

Free online webinars 10:00-11:00. Register here

September 6th

A trip through the garden: plant based presentations

There are a wide variety of substances occurring in the natural environment. Some plants and mushrooms have long histories of use in different cultures. This presentation will provide an overview of a small selection of naturally occurring substances that clinicians may encounter in their work. It will cover DMT, magic mushrooms, mescaline containing cactus, opium poppies and datura with information on prevalence, effects and potential risks and harms.”

September 13th

A healthy lifestyle approach to co-existing mental health and substance problems

The 20 year gap in longevity between people with, versus without, co-existing mental health and substance misuse problems has drawn recent focus to quality of life and physical health more broadly. This presentation focuses on the progression from single focus (mental health) to dual focus (mental health and substance misuse) and then to a broader recovery focus and recommendations for conceptualising, screening and addressing substance use disorders within mental health systems.

 


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Annotated bibliography: Closing the gap in Indigenous mental health

Calma, T., Dudgeon, P., & Bray, A. (2017). Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander social and emotional wellbeing and mental health. Australian Psychologist, 52(4), 255-260.

This report identifies the large gap suffered by the Indigenous community as compared to non-Indigenous Australians. It discusses several reasons for this including the trauma of colonisation, racism, poverty, disconnection from their culture and healthcare practices that are not culturally appropriate. It emphasises that Indigenous mental health should be an approach that improves the social and emotional well-being (SEWB) of Indigenous Australians. This a more holistic and collaborative approach to health than the Western concept and it incorporates the many socio-economic factors that influence Aboriginal health with an emphasis on prevention. Community engagement, involvement and empowerment are essential components of any initiative, along with self-determination and a recognition of cultural differences.

Carey, T. A., Dudgeon, P., Hammond, S. W., Hirvonen, T., Kyrios, M., Roufeil, L., & Smith, P. (2017). The Australian Psychological Society’s apology to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Australian Psychologist, 52(4), 261-267.

This report examines the history of The Australian Psychology Society’s (APS) treatment of Aboriginal Australians. It discusses the lack of involvement of Indigenous Australians in policy and advisory roles and admits to a lack of articles in Australian Psychologist about improving Indigenous SEWB. It details the improvements it has made over the years including an Indigenous psychology group, education in culturally appropriate treatment and encouragement to Indigenous people to become psychologists. This progress culminated in an apology to the Indigenous peoples of Australian in 2016 that was well thought out, discussed, and received positive feedback from both Indigenous and professional groups. It acknowledges that it still has a way to go to bridge the gap.

Dudgeon, P., Bray, A., D’Costa, B., & Walker, R. (2017). Decolonising psychology: Validating social and emotional wellbeing. Australian Psychologist, 52(4), 316-325.

This report examines each of the seven domains, which interconnect to maintain the SEWB of Indigenous Australians. These are mind and emotions, family and kinship, community, culture, Country and spirituality. It is important that these are incorporated into any program with the aim of improving the mental health of Aboriginals. It explains how disconnect from any of these domains can be detrimental to the mental health or SEWB of each individual.

Geia, L., Pearson, L., & Sweet, M. (2017). Narratives of Twitter as a platform for professional development, innovation, and advocacy. Australian Psychologist, 52(4), 280-287.

This report examines how Twitter engagement can help to raise health professionals’ awareness of SEWB in Indigenous Australians. It utilises narrative methodology supplied by an Indigenous nurse-midwife, an Indigenous educator and a non-Indigenous journalist. Innovative platforms are developed on Twitter such as @IndigenousX which enable Indigenous people to reflect upon and discuss their SEWB. These accounts can then be followed by health professionals to gain an Indigenous perspective own health and SEWB. Indigenous people in turn benefit by having an arena for discussion and reflection. It identifies a gap in knowledge about whether psychologists are engaging in the sphere and if so are they benefitting from it?

Health, H. E., & Aboriginal. (2012). Closing the gap in a regional health service in NSW: a multistrategic approach to addressing individual and institutional racism. New South Wales Public Health Bulletin, 23(3-4), 63-67.

Hunter New England Health services the largest Aboriginal community in New South Wales. It identified problems with individual and institutional racism and culturally insensitive practices. The report details the steps it took to address these problems and thus reduce the gap in healthcare experienced by Aboriginal people. Partnerships were formed with Aboriginal groups and advice was sought from them. Three strategies were employed: staff and managerial training and education; leadership and consultation; negotiation and partnerships. It stresses the importance of ongoing commitment to address this organisational goal.

Otim, M., Kelaher, M., Anderson, I., & Doran, C. (2014). Priority setting in Indigenous health: assessing priority setting process and criteria that should guide the health system to improve Indigenous Australian health. International Journal for Equity in Health, 13(1), 1-12.

There is a large gap in health outcomes between Indigenous and other Australians, which the Australian Government has pledged to close. The objective of this study was to gauge the perceptions of Indigenous and non-Indigenous decision makers of priority setting in Indigenous healthcare. It identified an economic approach to priority setting was acceptable and useful in Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services with the potential to utilise evidence in its implementation. This use of evidence will help to maximise health outcomes for Aboriginal people thus reducing the health care gap experienced by them.

Ralph, S., & Ryan, K. (2017). Addressing the mental health gap in working with Indigenous youth: Some considerations for non‐Indigenous psychologists working with Indigenous youth. Australian Psychologist, 52(4), 288-298.

Indigenous youth between the ages of 15-24 are recognised as one of the most disadvantaged and vulnerable groups in Australia. The article reviews the current knowledge about the mental health needs and SEWB of this group. Psychological strategies such as the Access to Allied Psychological Services program are examined as to their relevance and effectiveness. It identifies that whilst Indigenous mental health workers are the ideal, but due to a lack of a skilled and available workforce who are able to deal with the complexity of needs in this client group, non-Indigenous psychologists need to be used. It does however confirm that the psychologist needs to be culturally aware of the needs of the youth in order to engage with them and successfully manage their treatment.

Smith, S., O’Grady, L., Cubillo, C., & Cavanagh, S. (2017). Using culturally appropriate approaches to the development of KidsMatter resources to support the social and emotional wellbeing of Aboriginal children. Australian Psychologist, 52(4), 299-305.

KidsMatter is an Australian initiative aimed at improving the mental health of young children in primary school and early childhood centres. A need for resources aimed at improving the SEWB of Aboriginal children was identified. The report details the development of this project. The project utilised participatory action, narrative therapy and critically reflective practice to define the Aboriginal perspective of SEWB. Aboriginal cultural consultants worked collaboratively with schools, health professionals and members of the Aboriginal community to develop culturally appropriate and effective resources. This resulted in a collection of culturally appropriate and professional learning tools to use in the promotion of SEWB for Aboriginal children.

Togni, S. J. (2017). The Uti Kulintjaku Project: The path to clear thinking. An evaluation of an innovative, Aboriginal‐Led approach to developing bi‐cultural understanding of mental health and wellbeing. Australian Psychologist, 52(4), 268-279.

Uti kulintjaku (UK) means to think and understand clearly and the objective of the project was to strengthen the understanding of mental health between Aboriginal people and non-Aboriginal health professionals. This project examined an innovative approach to bridging the gap between Western health care and traditional Indigenous care. It involved a group of senior Indigenous women working collaboratively with non-Indigenous health care professionals, all of whom had substantial experience in working in Indigenous communities. The aim was bridge any misunderstandings caused by language differences and improve the SEWB of the community. The woman who participated in the project have become empowered as a team and have learnt a lot about themselves, whilst increasing their self-confidence. The use of culture has reinvigorated cultural knowledge and several posters were developed which can be used in the future. Discussion in the community about mental health and finding new ways to tackle it and work with mental health services to enhance SEWB has increased. The tenets of the project of promoting healing and empowerment of individuals and groups were critical to the success of the project. It began as a language project but developed into increased shared understanding and it demonstrated the importance of traditional cultural methods such as story-telling and art in the healing process.

Postscript

These resources are all available to Healthy Options Australia employees, student and volunteers from the library database. Please email the library if you experience any problems in accessing them.

library@hoa.org.au


Leave a comment

August PD

You can add to the professional development post by commenting below or emailing the library.

Online resources

Webpage

Orygen: the National Centre for Excellence in Youth Mental Health

Read – professional reading

Available from the library database

Jordan, C. J., & Andersen, S. L. (2017). Sensitive periods of substance abuse: Early risk for the transition to dependence. Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, 25(1), 29-44.

Kay, G., Kendall, E., & Dark, F. (2017). Are Hearing Voices Networks Compatible with Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Psychosis?. Australian Social Work, 70(3), 312-323.

Kurtz, S. P., Buttram, M. E., Pagano, M. E., & Surratt, H. L. (2017). A randomized trial of brief assessment interventions for young adults who use drugs in the club scene. Journal Of Substance Abuse Treatment, 78(1), 64-73.

Williams, E. C., Lapham, G. T., Bobb, J. F., Rubinsky, A. D., Catz, S. L., Shortreed, S. M., & … Bradley, K. A. (2017). Documented brief intervention not associated with resolution of unhealthy alcohol use one year later among VA patients living with HIV. Journal Of Substance Abuse Treatment, 78(1), 8-14.

Wilson, S. R., Rodda, S., Lubman, D. I., Manning, V., & Yap, M. B. (2017). How online counselling can support partners of individuals with problem alcohol or other drug use. Journal Of Substance Abuse Treatment, 78(1), 56-62.

Open Access Articles

Open access online journal

Alcohol and Alcoholism: Offers free online access to all articles over 12 months old

Useful resource

QUT ePrints: an open access repository of the university’s research

e-Book of the month

Saethre, E. (2013). Illness Is a Weapon : Indigenous Identity and Enduring Afflictions. Nashville: Vanderbilt University Press.

Illness Is a Weapon presents an engaging portrayal of the everyday experience of disease in a remote Australian Aboriginal community. While chronic Aboriginal ill health has become an important national issue in Australia, Saethre breaks new ground by locating sickness within the daily lives of Indigenous people. Drawing on more than a decade of ethnographic research in the Northern Territory, Saethre explores the factors structuring ill health, the tactics individuals use to negotiate these realities, and the ways in which disease and medical narratives are employed to construct, manage, and challenge social relations. Reframing current debates, this book argues that disease and suffering have become powerful expressions of Indigenous identity. Through dialogues and interactions, Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people engage in a reciprocal discussion about the past, present, and future of indigeneity.Rarely is disease and suffering understood as a form of protest, and in Illness Is a Weapon, Saethre confronts the stark reality of the current contest between all parties in this struggle. As Saethre explains,’Cursing at nurses, refusing to take medication, and accepting acute illness as unremarkable is simultaneously an act of defiance and a rejection of vulnerability.’ (Copied from book description)

Free to download for all HOA staff from the library catalogue on work computers. Ask the staff if you need remote access

Attend – informal learning sessions, journal club, seminar series

Stayed tuned for Insight Qld Semester 2 Training but online induction modules which are a prerequisite to some of the courses are available. To access and download them visit www.insightqld.org

Attend – conferences 

International Indigenous Drug and Alcohol Misuse Conference

21-23 August, Stamford Plaza Hotel, Brisbane

Highlighting a holistic approach to alcohol and drug programs

Cost-$650-1200. Register here

National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre: Changing the Game: 30 years of drug and alcohol research

Sydney, October 3-4

Examining the changes that have occurred over the last 30 years and presenting cutting edge research in treatment, prevention and policy.

Cost $250-500. For more details click here 

Listen – podcasts, webinars

Visit Insight’s YouTube channel for free webinars

NHMRC Substance Use Webinars. Access on demand

Assessed learning – short courses, certificates, diplomas, bachelors, post-grad

Learning to Teach Online

Free online course aiming to teach educators how to improve their online or blended teaching practices. It runs over 6 weeks and involves 3-4 hours study per week. Starts on 14/08/2017. For more details and to enrol click here


Leave a comment

July PD

You can add to the professional development post by commenting below or emailing the library.

Online resources

Read – professional reading

Available from the library database

Clough, A., Margolis, S., Miller, A., Shakeshaft, A., Doran, C., McDermott, R., & … West, C. (2017). Alcohol management plans in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous) Australian communities in Queensland: community residents have experienced favourable impacts but also suffered unfavourable ones. BMC Public Health, 17(1), 1-14.

Degenhardt, L., Sara, G., McKetin, R., Roxburgh, A., Dobbins, T., Farrell, M., & … Hall, W. D. (2017). Crystalline methamphetamine use and methamphetamine‐related harms in Australia. Drug And Alcohol Review, 36(2), 160-170.

Jakobsen, H., Andersson, G., Havik, O. E., & Nordgreen, T. (2017). Guided Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy for mild and moderate depression: A benchmarking study. Internet Interventions, 7(1), 1-8.

Tolou-Shams, M., Dauria, E., Conrad, S. M., Kemp, K., Johnson, S., & Brown, L. K. (2017). Outcomes of a family-based HIV prevention intervention for substance using juvenile offenders. Journal Of Substance Abuse Treatment, 77(1), 115-125.

 

Open Access Articles

 

 

Open access online journal

Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health

Useful resources

NCETA’s Ice Training for Frontline Workers

A free comprehensive evidence based resource. NCETA continues to update and expand the resource, and Centre staff are working on a series of customised topics to address the professional development needs of specific workforces. These include the following customised topics which will be added to the resource in the next few months:

  • Working with families in which methamphetamine use is a problem
  • Working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People and Communities
  • Recovery-focused support.

Drug and alcohol research connections

A joint publication of the collaborative network of alcohol and other drug research centres; National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre (NDARC) at UNSW; National Drug Research Institute (NDRI) at Curtin University; and National Centre for Education and Training on Addiction (NCETA) at Flinders University.

e-Book of the month

Bhatia, S. C., Petty, F., & Gabel, T. (2017). Substance and Nonsubstance Related Addiction Disorder: Diagnosis and Treatment. [S.l.]: Bentham Science Publishers Ltd.

Substance and Non substance Related Addiction Disorders: Diagnosis and Treatment is an accessible handbook about the two main types of addiction disorders. It is divided into three sections which cover 1) the scientific underpinnings of addiction disorders (neurobiology, addiction neural reward pathways, genetic and psychosocial basis of addiction, screening and treatment), 2) information about substances commonly used by addicts (pharmacology, diagnostics and treatment considerations) and 3) current understandings of the diagnosis and treatment of behavioral problems (such as gambling), respectively. Key features: -covers both substance abuse and behavioral problems -uses a reader friendly format with a patient education handout style -includes key learning points listed in each chapter -includes clinical vignettes which outline brief history, evaluation, diagnostic considerations with successful pharmacological, psychological and social interventions -includes references in each chapter The handbook meets the information needs of medical students and professionals (family physicians, nurses, addiction therapists, psychiatry residents, and other health care professionals) interested in the primary care of patients afflicted with addiction disorders.Subjects:Substance abuse–Treatment

Free to download for all HOA staff from the EBSCO Host platform on work computers

Attend – informal learning sessions, journal club, seminar series

Alcohol and other drug treatment in prison

Presenter: Michael Doyle, University of Sydney

Thursday, 6 July 2017 @ 2pm-3pm

This Aboriginal-led PhD project investigated the experiences of 31 men (14 Aboriginal and 17 non-Aboriginal) of prison-based AoD treatment programs. The results and findings for this research will be reported in this presentation, which will also include findings from a systematic review of international peer-reviewed literature in prison-based AoD treatment research. Cost: free of charge

 Venue and full details

RSVP: ndriau@curtin.edu.au

 

Insight Queensland

Free training session at Biala Community Health Centre in Brisbane:

Culturally secure AOD practice featuring IRIS

This updated 2-day workshop aims to build cultural capacity when working with Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people who use substances. Designed for both Indigenous and non-Indigenous workers alike, the course promotes a culturally-secure AOD framework and approach to direct practice.

Participants will learn how to use the Indigenous Risk Impact Screen (IRIS) and associated brief intervention tools alongside other practical tips, tricks, tools and resources for use in everyday practice.

Dates 4-5/07/2017 9-4pm

Register here

Online induction modules are a prerequisite to some of the courses. To access and download them visit www.insightqld.org

Attend – conferences 

APSAD Scientific Alcohol and Drugs Conference, Melbourne, 12-15 November 2017.

No details on program as yet.

Registration between $540-1170 for the full conference, depnding when you register and your professional status

Write – presentations and papers

ATCA Conference –  Brisbane from 31 October to 3 November 2017.

Information will be posted on the ATCA website in the coming days, and registrations will be open this week.  There will be site visits to TCs on the Gold Coast (Goldbridge and Fairhaven), the Sunshine Coast (WHOS Najara) and Brisbane (Logan House and Moonyah) on Tuesday 31 November, followed by the conference program on Wednesday-Friday and concluding with interactive workshops on Friday afternoon (3 November).

A Call for Abstracts has now gone out and submissions close on Friday 25 August 2017 in the following themes:

ATCA recognises that not all innovation comes from research but from the need to tackle a persistent problem, using creativity, imagination and ingenuity. If you have a story, message or anecdote to share, then share your work and ideas with them. Conference Themes include:

  • TC practice: Partnerships for new ideas and new initiatives
  • Cultural partnerships: working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander, Mãori and Pasifika peoples
  • Working with Families: Family involvement in treatment, interventions for children affected by parental substance use and associated issues
  • Continuing care: Re-thinking community partnerships
  • Co-morbidity: Best practice for people with co-occurring AOD and mental health issues
  • Corrective services and coerced clients: Working collaboratively with our partners in the justice system
  • Attachment and Trauma: Interventions and recovery

Applications will be assessed on the following criteria:

  • The relevance of the abstract to the themes
  • The validity of the evidence on which the presentation is based
  • The implications for practitioners implementing the findings
  • The relevance of innovative programmes to other practitioners in the field.

Presenters are required to register for the Australasian Therapeutic Communities Conference. 

Presentation Types:

Oral Presentation: These will take place in chaired sessions and are 15 minutes in length plus 5 minutes question time. 

Poster display: poster presentations are visual displays used to communicate a message i.e. research findings, program highlights, etc. Poster presenters will be provided with maximum coverage through dedicated poster sessions during which time presenters are required to stand by their posters. This provides an intimate forum for the exchange of information by allowing more personal discussion between presenter and audience.  Posters may be in a traditional format, or as a  Powerpoint presentation on a continuous loop on the presenter’s own laptop.

Participatory workshop: There is the opportunity for half-day workshops on Friday afternoon (3 November) to encourage the interactive transfer of skills and practical solutions to common problems or specific themes.

Project Snapshot: Each project snapshot will be allocated 10-minute oral presentation time with the use of audio-visual equipment if desired and four minutes of questions.

Seminar: Several presenters are encouraged to submit a group of abstracts on a specific topic and share a 90-minute presentation time as they explore the topic in depth. These sessions will be led by a facilitator.

Yarning Circle: The Circle will be permanently accessible as a Cultural Space as well as having times for organised sessions during the conference gathering. These sessions will be led by a main presenter, or group of presenters, and be approximately one hour in duration with the opportunity for multiple speakers on given themes.

Yarning is an informal conversation that is culturally friendly and recognised by Aboriginal people as meaning to talk about something, someone or provide and receive information (Dawn Bessarab, 2012).  In the conference context, it is a place where all people can have a casual or deep conversation about something or anything. The truth is always spoken in a yarning circle. Yarning circles are designed so that everyone has an opportunity to contribute in a safe and respectful setting. The yarning circle will have a few main speakers to lead discussion however, all attendees are encouraged to participate in the conversation if they feel comfortable.

Submit your abstracts to atca@atca.com.au

Listen – podcasts, webinars

Alcohol and mental health podcast

Alcohol use disorder is often co-morbid with a variety of mental health conditions. It can be challenging for clinicians to tease out which of these conditions are primary, with alcohol being used as an attempt to alleviate symptoms, and which of these are secondary to the physiological and psychosocial impacts of alcohol itself.  (50 minutes duration)

Access here

Watch – videos

First time with a new pill or powder: This short video published back in 2013 from Global Drug Survey called “First time with a new pill or powder”, provides common sense harm reduction information for people who use or are planning to experiment with pills or powders as these substances can sometimes cause significant harm.