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February PD

You can add to the professional development post by commenting below or emailing the library.

Online resources

Read – professional reading

Available from the library database

  • Chen, J. A., Owens, M. D., Browne, K. C., & Williams, E. C. (2018). Alcohol-related and mental health care for patients with unhealthy alcohol use and posttraumatic stress disorder in a National Veterans Affairs cohort. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 85, 1-9.
  • Cunningham, M., Stapinski, L., Griffiths, S., & Baillie, A. (2017). Dysmorphic Appearance Concern and Hazardous Alcohol Use in University Students: The Mediating Role of Alcohol Expectancies. Australian Psychologist, 52 (6), 424-432.
  • Gair, S., & Baglow, L. (2017). Australian Social Work Students Balancing Study, Work, and Field Placement: Seeing it Like it Is. Australian Social Work, 1-12.
  • Powers, J. R., Loxton, D., Anderson, A. E., Dobson, A. J., Mishra, G. D., Hockey, R., & Brown, W. J. (2018). Changes in smoking, drinking, overweight and physical inactivity in young Australian women 1996–2013. Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 28(3), 255-259.
  • Thompson, K., & van Vliet, P. (2018). Critical Reflection on the Ethics of Mindfulness. Australian Social Work, 71(1), 120-128.
Open Access Articles

 

Open access online journal

Addictive behaviours

Open access textbook

Lester, D. (2014). The” I” of the Storm: Understanding the Suicidal Mind. Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG.

Useful resources

Harm Reduction Australia, Opioid Treatment Programs 2017 Forum Reports: Queensland; NSW; Victoria

Hepatitis SA Library for resources and information on hepatitis

Open access resources for health sciences from Curtin University

e-Book of the month

Bhatia, S. C., Petty, F., & Gabel, T. (2017). Substance and Nonsubstance Related Addiction Disorder: Diagnosis and Treatment. [S.l.]: Bentham Science Publishers Ltd.

An accessible handbook about the two main types of addiction disorders. It is divided into three sections which cover 1) the scientific underpinnings of addiction disorders (neurobiology, addiction neural reward pathways, genetic and psychosocial basis of addiction, screening and treatment), 2) information about substances commonly used by addicts (pharmacology, diagnostics and treatment considerations) and 3) current understandings of the diagnosis and treatment of behavioral problems (such as gambling), respectively. Key features: covers both substance abuse and behavioral problems uses a reader friendly format with a patient education handout style includes key learning points listed in each chapter -includes clinical vignettes which outline brief history, evaluation, diagnostic considerations with successful pharmacological, psychological and social interventions -includes references in each chapter disorders. (copied from the EBSCO database)

Free to download for all HOA staff from the library catalogue on work computers

Attend – informal learning sessions, journal club, seminar series

 

National comorbidity guidelines free online training and website

The training program consists of 10 training modules that can be completed in any order. Registrants can choose which modules to engage in based on interest and experience. Those wishing to receive a certificate of completion must complete all modules (in any order) and successfully complete all quizzes.

At the end of each module, registrants will be presented with a quiz. All questions must be answered correctly before the module is completed, but there is no limit to how many times the quiz can be taken. Incorrect answers will refer participants to relevant sections of the Guidelines website.

At the completion of all modules, training participants will receive a certificate of completion.

Journal club TBA

Attend – conferences 

Australia and New Zealand Addiction Conference, 28-30 May 2018 at QT Gold Coast

This conference will cover a range of topics including  prevention, treatment, systematic responses, behaviours, mental health and harm reduction in relation to all types of addiction.  The program will include emerging trends and the various addictive habits of alcohol and other drugs, gambling, internet, sex, gaming,  food, shopping, pyromania, kleptomania.

Cost from $500-1000. Register here

Write – presentations and papers

Are you thinking of getting your work published in an academic journal? Read these tips of what not to do from a large publisher.

Call for abstract submissions for the Australia and New Zealand Addiction Conference. It can be in the form of a 3o minute presentation, a poster presentation or a panel presentation on one of the conference topics. Closing date 05/02/2018. More details are available here.

Listen – podcasts, webinars

NueRA talks:  a series of free online seminars which bring information on neuroscience research. Examples include:

  • Living loving schizophrenia
  • The neuroscience of resilience to stress

Insight presentation recordings available now on YouTube

Assessed learning – short courses, certificates, diplomas, bachelors, post-grad

Strengths based practice: This workshop will provide participants with the chance to practice strength based skills:

Date: 22/02/2018, 09:00-16:30

Location:      Lighthouse Resources Upstairs Training Room Kyabra Street RUNCORN, QLD. 4113

Cost: $240. Register here

Lighthouse Resources run a number of other workshops

 

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Annotated bibliography: LGBTIQ+

The acronym LGBTIQ+ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex, queer and other sexual minorities) is used in the title, but where other acronyms were used by the writers, these have been adopted in the bibliography.

Baskerville, N. B., Dash, D., Shuh, A., Wong, K., Abramowicz, A., Yessis, J., & Kennedy, R. D. (2017). Tobacco use cessation interventions for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer youth and young adults: A scoping review. Preventive Medicine Reports.

Canadian statistics have indicated that LGBTQ+ youth and young adults have a significantly higher smoking rate than their non-LGBTQ+ counterparts. It has been suggested that this may be due to minority stress and discrimination. This has led to a need for culturally appropriate prevention and cessation programs tailored to the needs of this population. A scoping review aiming to map the literature on the programs available for LGBTQ+ young adults and youth was performed. It identified a large research gap in smoking prevention and cessation programs for this group, with little aimed specifically at the young LGBTQ+ age group. A need for community focused, effective and engaging community programs for this group was recognised.

Bond, K. S., Jorm, A. F., Kelly, C. M., Kitchener, B. A., Morris, S. L., & Mason, R. J. (2017). Considerations when providing mental health first aid to an LGBTIQ person: a Delphi study. Advances in Mental Health, 1-15.

The aim of this study was to develop guidelines for delivering appropriate and sensitive mental health first aid to LGBTIQ people, which can be used in conjunction with existing guidelines. The Delphi method was utilized, where a consensus is gained by a team, in this case a group of mental health professionals who either identified as LGBTIQ or had experience in working with this group. Numerous sources have identified a higher prevalence of mental health disorders, substance use disorders, suicidality and self-harm in LGBTIQ populations so the development of appropriate guidelines was deemed as important. A systematic review of journal articles, websites and books was performed to develop a questionnaire of the knowledge, skills and actions needed for assisting an LGBTIQ person experiencing a mental health problem. The experts rated these over three rounds as to whether they should appear in the guidelines. The results highlighted the complexity of supporting an LGBTIQ person experiencing mental health problems, along with the diversity of the population and their differing needs. The limitation was that the study focused on a Western, English speaking population. It recommended expanding it to examine the needs of Indigenous Australian and culturally and linguistically diverse LGBTIQ groups.

Colpitts, E., & Gahagan, J. (2016). The utility of resilience as a conceptual framework for understanding and measuring LGBTQ health. International Journal for Equity in Health, 15(1), 60.

LGBTQ health research has traditionally focused on the deficit model and not on the ways that individuals in this group can improve their health. It is argued by the authors of this paper that a culturally competent health policy requires an evidence base that is focused on strengths rather than weaknesses. A scoping review was performed on strength-based approaches to LGBTQ health which indicated the concept of resilience as a key component. This resilience may have been built up due to discrimination and adversity. It identified a need for further research into LGBTQ- specific models of health policy and measures of resilience. They concluded that the resilience of LGBTQ population is embedded in advancing their health, although more research needs to be done before it is useful as a measurement of LGBTQ health.

Kelly, J., Davis, C., & Schlesinger, C. (2015). Substance use by same sex attracted young people: prevalence, perceptions and homophobia. Drug and Alcohol Review, 34(4), 358-365.

Research has indicated that LGBT people use alcohol and drugs (AOD) more than their heterosexual counterparts, but usage by LGBT youth is less understood. The aim of the study was to investigate the prevalence and perception of AOD use in LGBT youth in comparison with heterosexual youth. The impacts of homophobia and minority stress were also examined. It found that AOD use is higher in LGBT youth than heterosexual youth, with significantly higher rates in LGBT people under 18 years old. Those who believed homophobia impacted on AOD use were much more likely to use AOD themselves. It recommended that AOD agencies better support LGBT youth by screening for sexuality and gender identity and exploring issues specific to this group to improve the services that are offered.

Kidd, S. A., Howison, M., Pilling, M., Ross, L. E., & McKenzie, K. (2016). Severe mental illness in LGBT populations: A scoping review. Psychiatric Services, 67(7), 779-783.

The impact of stigma on the mental health of sexual and gender minority groups has widespread recognition. This is coupled with a movement towards increasing diversity in mental health services, but relatively little has been developed for severe mental illness. The authors define severe mental illness as that which is associated with psychosis and requires extensive periods of inpatient or outpatient treatment. A literature review was conducted which aimed to answer the question “What factors and strategies need to be considered when developing services for individuals from sexual or gender minority groups who are experiencing severe mental illness?” The 27 articles reviewed were in the main North American. A general dissatisfaction in mental health services was identified amongst the LGBT population and little evidence regarding culturally specific interventions. An increased risk of severe mental illness has been suggested which has been associated with discrimination. The report highlighted a need for research into specific interventions for LGBT people with severe mental illness, along with studies to inform efforts to reduce morbidity associated with discrimination.

Lea, T., Kolstee, J., Lambert, S., Ness, R., Hannan, S., & Holt, M. (2017). Methamphetamine treatment outcomes among gay men attending a LGBTI-specific treatment service in Sydney, Australia. PloS One, 12(2), e0172560

Gay and bisexual men (GBM) report higher rates of methamphetamine use compared to heterosexual men, and thus have a heightened risk of developing problems from their use. We examined treatment outcomes among GBM clients receiving outpatient counseling at a LGBTI-specific, harm reduction treatment service in Sydney, Australia. GBM receiving treatment for methamphetamine use from ACON’s Substance Support Service between 2012–15 (n = 101) were interviewed at treatment commencement, and after 4 sessions (n = 60; follow-up 1) and 8 sessions (n = 32; follow-up 2). At each interview, clients completed measures of methamphetamine use and dependence, other substance use, injecting risk practices, psychological distress and quality of life. The median age of participants was 41 years and 56.4% identified as HIV-positive. Participants attended a median of 5 sessions and attended treatment for a median of 112 days. There was a significant reduction in the median days of methamphetamine use in the previous 4 weeks between baseline (4 days), follow-up 1 (2 days) and follow-up 2 (2 days; p = .001). There was a significant reduction in the proportion of participants reporting methamphetamine dependence between baseline (92.1%), follow-up 1 (78.3%) and follow-up 2 (71.9%, p < .001). There were also significant reductions in psychological distress (p < .001), and significant improvements in quality of life (p < .001). Clients showed reductions in methamphetamine use and improved psychosocial functioning over time, demonstrating the potential effectiveness of a LGBTI-specific treatment service (copy of abstract used).

Skerrett, D. M., Kõlves, K., & De Leo, D. (2015). Are LGBT populations at a higher risk for suicidal behaviors in Australia? Research findings and implications. Journal of Homosexuality, 62(7), 883-901.

This is a review of Australian peer-reviewed literature published between 2008 and 2012 about suicidality in LGBT populations. It was performed to collect evidence on their reportedly higher incidence of suicidality and to identify predictive factors such as coming out, homophobia and non-acceptance by family and friends. The authors studied twelve articles, none of which was population-based. The evidence confirmed that LGBT people are at higher risk of suicidal behaviours Gaps in the literature included a lack of research on suicide deaths and a reliance on cross-sectional studies and convenience sampling usually with self-selected participants. Risk factors for suicidal behaviour in common with the non-LGBT population included mental illness and substance abuse, along with the unique factors discussed earlier. It was confirmed that gay men are a higher risk of suicidality than heterosexual men are, but at lower risk than bisexual men. The authors recommend that further research be undertaken to provide the evidence for future targeted intervention programs.

Stanley, N., Ellis, J., Farrelly, N., Hollinghurst, S., Bailey, S., & Downe, S. (2017). “What matters to someone who matters to me”: using media campaigns with young people to prevent interpersonal violence and abuse. Health Expectations, 20(4), 648-654.

This article examine ways that media campaigns could be used to prevent interpersonal violence and abuse (IPVA). Whilst not specifically about LGBT young adults it was identified that as although there is evidence of IPVA in LGBT communities on a par with heterosexual young adults, there is a lack of materials aimed at this group. This can be complicated by the threat of unwanted ‘outing’, particularly in young adults who may still be coming to terms with their sexuality. This lower disclosure rate results in a reluctance to access support and consequently support services are scarcer. Research and consultation with the target audience is important in producing effective campaigns.

Su, D., Irwin, J. A., Fisher, C., Ramos, A., Kelley, M., Mendoza, D. A. R., & Coleman, J. D. (2016). Mental health disparities within the LGBT population: A comparison between transgender and nontransgender individuals. Transgender Health, 1(1), 12-20.

A 2011 survey in the USA indicated that 41% of the transgender population had considered suicide compared to 1.6%of the general population. This could be associated with discrimination, which is a risk factor for depression. Transgender people commonly experience discrimination, including in healthcare settings. In addition, they often experience feelings of shame, rejection, isolation and anger, all of which may lead to depression. The study compared transgender participants with non-transgender participants for discrimination, depression and attempted suicide. It identified that transgender people had a higher incidence of all three, which was reduced with self-acceptance of their identity.

Talley, A. E., Gilbert, P. A., Mitchell, J., Goldbach, J., Marshall, B. D., & Kaysen, D. (2016). Addressing gaps on risk and resilience factors for alcohol use outcomes in sexual and gender minority populations. Drug and Alcohol Review, 35(4), 484-493.

This mini literature review aimed to examine the state of alcohol-related research in LGBT populations and in doing so identify any gaps in knowledge. Research was classified according to age groups and biological gender. The research contributed to a growing understanding of the differences in sub-groups within the LGBT population. Influences which account for these differences were identified but there are still large gaps in the knowledge, including the role of gender identity. The importance of how minority stress and society and relationships contribute to alcohol misuse over time were also identified. More studies are recommended to gain a clearer understanding.

 

With the exception of the articles from Drug and Alcohol Review all these articles are Open Access and can be retrieved using the links. The Drug and Alcohol Review articles are available on the library database to Healthy Options Australia staff and volunteers.


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Mental health in rural and remote communties: annotated bibliography

Allen, J., Inder, K. J., Lewin, T. J., Attia, J., & Kelly, B. J. (2012). Social support and age influence distress outcomes differentially across urban, regional and remote Australia: an exploratory study. BMC Public Health, 12(1), 928.
The aim of this study was to examine whether increasing remoteness had any effect on psychological distress. 4219 people over 55 years were surveyed across New South Wales about their levels of social support, demographic details, remoteness and levels of psychological distress experienced. The report concluded that remoteness could reduce the levels of psychological distress associated with a lack of social support. This may be due to people living in remote areas having a higher level of self-sufficiency. The study was limited in that it only studied older people.
Blignault, I., Haswell, M., & Pulver, L. J. (2016). The value of partnerships: lessons from a multi‐site evaluation of a national social and emotional wellbeing program for Indigenous youth. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 40(S1).
This study provides the results of a three-year evaluation of SAM our way- a program that aimed to improve the social and emotional wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander living in remote and regional areas of Australia. Five out of the 14 sites were studied, selecting from diverse locations over several states and in depth case studies were performed. The best performing sites were those where strong local partnerships had been formed with the local Indigenous community. Several lessons were learned including the importance of program design and resourcing and ways of working. It was essential to build partnerships with the local community including training and engaging members and working consistently with them, taking things slowly. Evaluation is essential and needs to be built into the programs. Activities need to be engaging and, effective integrating with other programs and services.
Carey, T. A., Wakerman, J., Humphreys, J. S., Buykx, P., & Lindeman, M. (2013). What primary health care services should residents of rural and remote Australia be able to access? A systematic review of “core” primary health care services. BMC Health Services Research, 13(1), 178.
A systematic review was performed to address which primary healthcare services should be accessible to all Australians regardless of geography. It was done in response to the inequality in access to healthcare faced by those in remote and rural communities. It concluded that defining a list of core services was difficult but that they should be an appropriate fit for service and evidence-based. Policy makers, consumers, practitioners and researchers need to work together in developing them to ensure that they are affordable and accessible to all.
Inder, K. J., Handley, T. E., Fitzgerald, M., Lewin, T. J., Coleman, C., Perkins, D., & Kelly, B. J. (2012). Individual and district-level predictors of alcohol use: cross sectional findings from a rural mental health survey in Australia. BMC Public Health, 12(1), 586.
Excessive alcohol use has been cited as a problem in rural and remote Australia and this study aimed to examine the geographical variation in rates and the potential effects of socio-economic disadvantage, population change and remoteness from services in contributing to this disparity. A survey was performed on 1981 people randomly taken from the electoral role using the Australian Rural Mental Health Study. It found that gender, age, marital status and personality status were the biggest contributors to at risk alcohol use. Financial advantage and experiencing multiple recent adverse life events also contributed to increased alcohol use. Relatively few district-level factors were linked to increased alcohol consumption after controlling for other factors.
Inder, K. J., Handley, T. E., Johnston, A., Weaver, N., Coleman, C., Lewin, T. J., & Kelly, B. J. (2014). Determinants of suicidal ideation and suicide attempts: parallel cross-sectional analyses examining geographical location. BMC Psychiatry, 14(1), 208.
Suicide rates are consistently higher in rural than urban settings so this study aimed to examine if there were any differences in determinants of suicidal ideation and attempts between the areas. The main determinants were psychological distress and mental illness. Parallel cross-sectional analyses were performed using data from the 2007 National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing (n=8463) and the Australian Rural and Mental Health Study (n=634). The former was under representative of rural and remote participants and the latter was over representative. Geographical location was not found to be associated with suicidal ideation or attempt, but socio-economic factors were significantly associated with higher rates of suicidality. Access to lethal means and isolation, resulting in not being found quickly may also affect the rate of suicidality. It stressed the importance of developing and evaluating targeted evidence-based intervention strategies for at risk groups.
Morandini, J. S., Blaszczynski, A., Dar‐Nimrod, I., & Ross, M. W. (2015). Minority stress and community connectedness among gay, lesbian and bisexual Australians: a comparison of rural and metropolitan localities. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 39(3), 260-266.
The aim of this study was to examine the impact of locality on minority stress experienced by lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) Australians. Increased stress and lack of community connectedness experienced by LGB individuals has been associated with increased depression, drug and alcohol use and suicidality. Data was collected by survey (n=1306) to assess minority stressors, connection with community and social isolation. The results were than analysed to assess the effect of locality on these stressors independent of gender, age, ethnicity, education and income. Those living in rural and remote areas and unexpectedly outer metropolitan areas experienced higher levels of stressors and high LGB disconnection than those living in inner metropolitan areas. Reluctance to disclose sexuality, including increased concealment of sexuality from friends and internalised homophobia in men were more common in rural and remote communities. This will put them at increased risk of psychiatric morbidity. It recommends health promotion in these communities that is aimed at reducing homophobia and discrimination and support services to assist those struggling with stigma and isolation.


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July PD

You can add to the professional development post by commenting below or emailing the library.

Online resources

Read – professional reading

Available from the library database

Clough, A., Margolis, S., Miller, A., Shakeshaft, A., Doran, C., McDermott, R., & … West, C. (2017). Alcohol management plans in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous) Australian communities in Queensland: community residents have experienced favourable impacts but also suffered unfavourable ones. BMC Public Health, 17(1), 1-14.

Degenhardt, L., Sara, G., McKetin, R., Roxburgh, A., Dobbins, T., Farrell, M., & … Hall, W. D. (2017). Crystalline methamphetamine use and methamphetamine‐related harms in Australia. Drug And Alcohol Review, 36(2), 160-170.

Jakobsen, H., Andersson, G., Havik, O. E., & Nordgreen, T. (2017). Guided Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy for mild and moderate depression: A benchmarking study. Internet Interventions, 7(1), 1-8.

Tolou-Shams, M., Dauria, E., Conrad, S. M., Kemp, K., Johnson, S., & Brown, L. K. (2017). Outcomes of a family-based HIV prevention intervention for substance using juvenile offenders. Journal Of Substance Abuse Treatment, 77(1), 115-125.

 

Open Access Articles

 

 

Open access online journal

Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health

Useful resources

NCETA’s Ice Training for Frontline Workers

A free comprehensive evidence based resource. NCETA continues to update and expand the resource, and Centre staff are working on a series of customised topics to address the professional development needs of specific workforces. These include the following customised topics which will be added to the resource in the next few months:

  • Working with families in which methamphetamine use is a problem
  • Working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People and Communities
  • Recovery-focused support.

Drug and alcohol research connections

A joint publication of the collaborative network of alcohol and other drug research centres; National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre (NDARC) at UNSW; National Drug Research Institute (NDRI) at Curtin University; and National Centre for Education and Training on Addiction (NCETA) at Flinders University.

e-Book of the month

Bhatia, S. C., Petty, F., & Gabel, T. (2017). Substance and Nonsubstance Related Addiction Disorder: Diagnosis and Treatment. [S.l.]: Bentham Science Publishers Ltd.

Substance and Non substance Related Addiction Disorders: Diagnosis and Treatment is an accessible handbook about the two main types of addiction disorders. It is divided into three sections which cover 1) the scientific underpinnings of addiction disorders (neurobiology, addiction neural reward pathways, genetic and psychosocial basis of addiction, screening and treatment), 2) information about substances commonly used by addicts (pharmacology, diagnostics and treatment considerations) and 3) current understandings of the diagnosis and treatment of behavioral problems (such as gambling), respectively. Key features: -covers both substance abuse and behavioral problems -uses a reader friendly format with a patient education handout style -includes key learning points listed in each chapter -includes clinical vignettes which outline brief history, evaluation, diagnostic considerations with successful pharmacological, psychological and social interventions -includes references in each chapter The handbook meets the information needs of medical students and professionals (family physicians, nurses, addiction therapists, psychiatry residents, and other health care professionals) interested in the primary care of patients afflicted with addiction disorders.Subjects:Substance abuse–Treatment

Free to download for all HOA staff from the EBSCO Host platform on work computers

Attend – informal learning sessions, journal club, seminar series

Alcohol and other drug treatment in prison

Presenter: Michael Doyle, University of Sydney

Thursday, 6 July 2017 @ 2pm-3pm

This Aboriginal-led PhD project investigated the experiences of 31 men (14 Aboriginal and 17 non-Aboriginal) of prison-based AoD treatment programs. The results and findings for this research will be reported in this presentation, which will also include findings from a systematic review of international peer-reviewed literature in prison-based AoD treatment research. Cost: free of charge

 Venue and full details

RSVP: ndriau@curtin.edu.au

 

Insight Queensland

Free training session at Biala Community Health Centre in Brisbane:

Culturally secure AOD practice featuring IRIS

This updated 2-day workshop aims to build cultural capacity when working with Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people who use substances. Designed for both Indigenous and non-Indigenous workers alike, the course promotes a culturally-secure AOD framework and approach to direct practice.

Participants will learn how to use the Indigenous Risk Impact Screen (IRIS) and associated brief intervention tools alongside other practical tips, tricks, tools and resources for use in everyday practice.

Dates 4-5/07/2017 9-4pm

Register here

Online induction modules are a prerequisite to some of the courses. To access and download them visit www.insightqld.org

Attend – conferences 

APSAD Scientific Alcohol and Drugs Conference, Melbourne, 12-15 November 2017.

No details on program as yet.

Registration between $540-1170 for the full conference, depnding when you register and your professional status

Write – presentations and papers

ATCA Conference –  Brisbane from 31 October to 3 November 2017.

Information will be posted on the ATCA website in the coming days, and registrations will be open this week.  There will be site visits to TCs on the Gold Coast (Goldbridge and Fairhaven), the Sunshine Coast (WHOS Najara) and Brisbane (Logan House and Moonyah) on Tuesday 31 November, followed by the conference program on Wednesday-Friday and concluding with interactive workshops on Friday afternoon (3 November).

A Call for Abstracts has now gone out and submissions close on Friday 25 August 2017 in the following themes:

ATCA recognises that not all innovation comes from research but from the need to tackle a persistent problem, using creativity, imagination and ingenuity. If you have a story, message or anecdote to share, then share your work and ideas with them. Conference Themes include:

  • TC practice: Partnerships for new ideas and new initiatives
  • Cultural partnerships: working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander, Mãori and Pasifika peoples
  • Working with Families: Family involvement in treatment, interventions for children affected by parental substance use and associated issues
  • Continuing care: Re-thinking community partnerships
  • Co-morbidity: Best practice for people with co-occurring AOD and mental health issues
  • Corrective services and coerced clients: Working collaboratively with our partners in the justice system
  • Attachment and Trauma: Interventions and recovery

Applications will be assessed on the following criteria:

  • The relevance of the abstract to the themes
  • The validity of the evidence on which the presentation is based
  • The implications for practitioners implementing the findings
  • The relevance of innovative programmes to other practitioners in the field.

Presenters are required to register for the Australasian Therapeutic Communities Conference. 

Presentation Types:

Oral Presentation: These will take place in chaired sessions and are 15 minutes in length plus 5 minutes question time. 

Poster display: poster presentations are visual displays used to communicate a message i.e. research findings, program highlights, etc. Poster presenters will be provided with maximum coverage through dedicated poster sessions during which time presenters are required to stand by their posters. This provides an intimate forum for the exchange of information by allowing more personal discussion between presenter and audience.  Posters may be in a traditional format, or as a  Powerpoint presentation on a continuous loop on the presenter’s own laptop.

Participatory workshop: There is the opportunity for half-day workshops on Friday afternoon (3 November) to encourage the interactive transfer of skills and practical solutions to common problems or specific themes.

Project Snapshot: Each project snapshot will be allocated 10-minute oral presentation time with the use of audio-visual equipment if desired and four minutes of questions.

Seminar: Several presenters are encouraged to submit a group of abstracts on a specific topic and share a 90-minute presentation time as they explore the topic in depth. These sessions will be led by a facilitator.

Yarning Circle: The Circle will be permanently accessible as a Cultural Space as well as having times for organised sessions during the conference gathering. These sessions will be led by a main presenter, or group of presenters, and be approximately one hour in duration with the opportunity for multiple speakers on given themes.

Yarning is an informal conversation that is culturally friendly and recognised by Aboriginal people as meaning to talk about something, someone or provide and receive information (Dawn Bessarab, 2012).  In the conference context, it is a place where all people can have a casual or deep conversation about something or anything. The truth is always spoken in a yarning circle. Yarning circles are designed so that everyone has an opportunity to contribute in a safe and respectful setting. The yarning circle will have a few main speakers to lead discussion however, all attendees are encouraged to participate in the conversation if they feel comfortable.

Submit your abstracts to atca@atca.com.au

Listen – podcasts, webinars

Alcohol and mental health podcast

Alcohol use disorder is often co-morbid with a variety of mental health conditions. It can be challenging for clinicians to tease out which of these conditions are primary, with alcohol being used as an attempt to alleviate symptoms, and which of these are secondary to the physiological and psychosocial impacts of alcohol itself.  (50 minutes duration)

Access here

Watch – videos

First time with a new pill or powder: This short video published back in 2013 from Global Drug Survey called “First time with a new pill or powder”, provides common sense harm reduction information for people who use or are planning to experiment with pills or powders as these substances can sometimes cause significant harm.

 

 


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June PD

You can add to the professional development post by commenting below or emailing the library.

Online resources

Cracks in the Ice is an online toolkit providing trusted, evidence-based, and up-to-date information and resources about crystal methamphetamine (ice) for the Australian community.

Conversations Matter  resources for discussing suicide

Schizophrenia library  free resources on schizophrenia

Read – professional reading

Available from the library database

Helmes, E., & Fudge, M. (2017). Psychological distress among Australian welfare recipient job seekers. Australian Journal of Psychology, 69(2), 106-111. doi:10.1111/ajpy.12123

Hyshka, E., Anderson, J. T., & Wild, T. C. (2017). Perceived unmet need and barriers to care amongst street‐involved people who use illicit drugs. Drug and Alcohol Review, 36(3), 295-304. doi:10.1111/dar.12427

Kolar, C., von Treuer, K., & Koh, C. (2017). Resilience in early‐career psychologists: Investigating challenges, strategies, facilitators, and the training pathway. Australian Psychologist, 52(3), 198-208. doi:10.1111/ap.12197

Likis‐Werle, E., & Borders, L. D. (2017). College women’s gender identity and their drinking choices. Journal of Addictions & Offender Counseling, 38(1), 16-32. doi:10.1002/jaoc.12026

Open Access Articles

Bischoff-Grethe, A., Connolly, C. G., Jordan, S. J., Brown, G. G., Paulus, M. P., Tapert, S. F., … & Grant, I. (2017). Altered reward expectancy in individuals with recent methamphetamine dependence. Journal of Psychopharmacology, 31(1), 17-30.

Open access online journals

PLOS Publications The latest scientific research available to anyone anytime

Open access textbooks

http://www.openaccesstextbooks.org/

e-Book of the month

Ethics in psychotherapy and counseling: a practical guide by Pope, K.S., Vasquez, M.J.T. (2011)

Free to download for all HOA staff from the library catalogue on work computers

Attend – informal learning sessions, journal club, seminar series

Insight Queensland

The timetable for semester 2 has not been released. Stay tuned for further updates.

Alternatively you can catch up with any webinars you have missed on their Vimeo channel

Journal club (available to Healthy Options workers only) Internal professional development session held in the Annerley boardroom and via Skype meeting. Date: TBC

Alcohol and other drugs workshop will be held in Adelaide on 29/06/2017. Cost $157.74. This workshop investigates the cycle of addiction and interventions to prevent or reduce harm related to the use of alcohol and other drugs. More details and  to register click here

Attend – conferences 

The 2017 Australian Youth AOD Conference will be held in Melbourne on August 17 and 18. The theme for the conference this year is “Identity” and will explore how young people develop their identity, how these identities can change and grow, and how youth workers can have a positive influence on this process. The conference will provide an opportunity to examine practice and learn about new and emerging ideas with a range of practice advancement workshops and keynote presentations. The conference will also give workers an opportunity to meet their colleagues, form connections and celebrate the unique work done in this field. Registrations are now open and early bird closes on July 1st 2017. Early bird full price ticket  (before 01/07/2017): $275, then $350. Student deals and single day attendance also available. Get them here

The 2017 Indigenous Drug and Alcohol Misuse Conference will be held in Brisbane on the 21-23 August. Cost from $900. For more details and to register click here

Write – presentations and papers

Australian Social Work

Get your work published:

  • An original article, which may report the findings of research (including systematic literature reviews) or critically analyse a policy, practice or theoretical issue. Original articles will be within the range of 4,000 to 6,000 words. An abstract of 100–150 words must be included, as well as an implications statement comprising two or three bullet points (between 50 and 75 words) summarising the unique contribution and relevance of the paper (e.g., to society, to social work, to social policy).
  • A Practice, Policy, & Perspectives (PPP) article, which may report the findings of small-scale practice-based research (e.g., evaluation research or case study) or examine an important policy issue. PPP articles will be within the range of 1,500 to 4,000 words. An abstract of no more than 100 words must be included , as well as an implications statement as per above. Please refer to the Practice, Policy, & Perspectives guidelines
  • A letter to the editor, which may respond to an issue raised by an article in the journal. A letter will not exceed 400 words. Letters to the editor are not peer-reviewed.
  • A commentary on a published article, which has been invited by the Editor, to stimulate debate on a topic. A commentary will not exceed 1,000 words. Commentaries are not peer-reviewed.
  • A book review, which has been invited by the Editor or Reviews Editor, on a recently published book determined by the Editor or Reviews Editor to be of interest to the journal’s readership. Book reviews should be between 600 and 800 words. Book reviews are not peer-reviewed. Please note that unsolicited book reviews are not accepted. Please refer to the book review guidelines

More details here

Listen – podcasts, webinars

NHMRC mental health and substance use webinars can be accessed on their Vimeo channel and include:

  • What can parents do to prevent teenage substance use?
  • National comorbidity guidelines: an evidence-based resource for drug and alcohol workers
  • Lesson planning with positive choices:  how to engage your students with evidence-based drug education
  • The use of behavioural activation therapy for depression among substance users

Assessed learning – short courses, certificates, diplomas, bachelors, post-grad

The Social Context of Mental Health and Illness

Learn how social factors promote mental health, influence the onset and course of mental illness, and affect how mental illnesses are diagnosed and treated. This course explores how our understanding of mental health and illness has been influenced by social attitudes and social developments in North America and around the world. The course begins by situating our contemporary mental health practices in historical context, then looks at different aspects of mental health, mental illness and mental health services and their connections to what’s going on in our social environment.

This is a free online course which starts on 05/06/2017 and is run over 6 weeks. Register here